Podcast Subscribe

Follow on Twitter

LiverKick.com Rankings


Heavyweight (Per 4/15)
1. Rico Verhoeven
2. Daniel Ghita
3. Gokhan Saki
4. Tyrone Spong
5. Peter Aerts
6. Errol Zimmerman up
7. Benjamin Adegbuyiup
8. Ismael Londt up
9. Hesdy Gerges up
10. Ben Edwards up

Light HW (per 4/15)
1. Gokhan Saki up
2. Tyrone Spong down
3. Danyo Ilunga
4. Nathan Corbett down
5. Saulo Cavalari

Middleweight (per 4/15)
1. Wayne Barrett
2. Joe Schilling
3. Artem Levin
4. Steven Wakeling
5. Franci Grajs

Welterweight (per 4/15)
1. Nieky Holzken 
2. Joseph Valtellini 
3. Simon Marcus
4. Marc de Bonte
5. Aussie Ouzgni

 

70kg (Per 4/15)
1. Davit Kiriaup
2. Andy Ristiedown
3. Robin van Roosmalendown
4. Giorgio Petrosyandown
5. Murthel Groenhart
6. Buakaw Banchamek
7. Dzhabar Askerov
8. Ky Hollenbeckup
9. Aikprachaup
10. Enriko Kehlup

65kg (per 1/20)
1. Masaaki Noiri
2. Mosab Amraniup
3. Yuta Kubo down
4. Sagetdao
5. Liam Harrison

Video

Our good friend Will, known as StillWill has made yet another of his highlight reels. You might remember his Badr Hari, Gokhan Saki or Melvin Manhoef videos. Well, this time around it is the retired, yet incredible, Masato. Masato was the kingpin of the K-1 MAX division since the inception of the division. The division was actually created with him in mind, a conglomeration of TBS and FEG, knowing that they had a huge star at their disposal by the way of Masato.

Masato was a rare combination of raw talent, skill, refinement, looks, charisma and just being a likable guy. Masato was a cultural icon in Japan; he appeared in films, television shows, newspapers, advertisements, everything. When Masato changed his hair, every major television personality had to follow suit, emulating his look. Masato was a trend-setter, really. Then there was his kickboxing career, as he is truly one of the greats in the 70kgs division. Many would argue the Greatest of all Time, and I'd be hard-pressed to argue that right now.

Add a comment

Remember that event about a month ago where Sudsakorn fought Petrosyan two weeks after fighting Kem Sitsongpeenong? I remember. I also remember trawling the internet for video. Well, I found it and am here to share.

Sudsakorn is in the blue gloves, and comes out in the pink afro, and Petrosyan wears red gloves, and comes out in his normal hair.

Note that Sudsakorn's January 15 bout in Thailand against Kem was at 67 kg. This fight is at 70 kg, which is Petrosyan's weight class. Reports are that Sudsakorn weighed in between 67 and 68 kg, while Petrosyan weighed in just shy of 70, presumably putting on 5 or so kg after weigh-ins.

Add a comment

It has been a slow time of the year for news regarding K-1, at least in the way of positive K-1 news. Amidst all of the turmoil, it is still uncertain if we'll see a K-1 World Grand Prix this year. With that sort of uncertainty, I feel like it is time to take a look back at what made K-1 just so great and loved by many fans. The K-1 World Grand Prix began in 1993 and has stretched on, yearly, until 2010, and in those years we saw stars built and saw them live out the remainder of their careers in that tournament.

Well, K-1's official YouTube channel has every World Grand Prix event from 1993 until 1999, from Branko Cikatic to Ernesto Hoost. So watch some of the best fights in kickboxing history in their entirety. Watch the fight that made me fall in love with K-1 below. [source]

Add a comment

There aren't many fighters who aren't world beaters that fans can get behind. In these fickle days, especially recently where we saw the tides magically turn on MMA fighter Fedor Emelianenko for racking up the third loss in his storied career, the second in a row, and fans decided he could not be the Greatest of All Time, because right now he isn't the greatest competing. That sort of logic boggle the mind, as being an all-time great is not something that can magically be diminished at the twilight of one's career when they suffer a few losses that should push them into retirement. If Fedor goes on a 5-fight losing streak to lesser fighters, maybe we can have this discussion.

Anyway.This weekend in Japan there was a J-Network kickboxing show, and one of the names on the card was none other than Fire Harada. If you don't know who Fire Harada is, think back to the K-1 -63kgs Grand Prix. Harada was by far the underdog of the whole thing, he came in with a distinct lack of skill but a burning passion and a perennial underdog attitude. He discussed his love for professional wrestling, especially Super Delphin, formerly of Michinoku Pro, then Osaka Pro more recently. That was his hero. Well, going into this fight this weekend, Fire Harada had spoken with a few news outlets about possible retirement.

J-Network has a UStream account now, and the fight is on there. I urge you, to watch this, in awe, and understand how it is impossible to not become absolutely enamored with Fire Harada and wish he could fight forever. [source]

Add a comment

Everyone who watches highlight reels knows that for MMA, it is hard to beat LayzietheSavage, but the world of kickboxing has a new hero who has emerged over the past year or so, and that is user StillWill. You might know him as the guy who won all of the awesome It's Showtime gear in our recent contest, or the guy who did the awesome Badr Hari and Melvin Manhoef tribute vids. Well, he is back, and the latest video is a Godkhan Saki video.

If you aren't familiar with Gokhan Saki, this video gives you and up close and personal view of just how incredible "The Rebel" is and why we are all huge fans of him. [source]

Add a comment