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LiverKick.com Rankings


Heavyweight (Per 4/15)
1. Rico Verhoeven
2. Daniel Ghita
3. Gokhan Saki
4. Tyrone Spong
5. Peter Aerts
6. Errol Zimmerman up
7. Benjamin Adegbuyiup
8. Ismael Londt up
9. Hesdy Gerges up
10. Ben Edwards up

Light HW (per 4/15)
1. Gokhan Saki up
2. Tyrone Spong down
3. Danyo Ilunga
4. Nathan Corbett down
5. Saulo Cavalari

Middleweight (per 4/15)
1. Wayne Barrett
2. Joe Schilling
3. Artem Levin
4. Steven Wakeling
5. Franci Grajs

Welterweight (per 4/15)
1. Nieky Holzken 
2. Joseph Valtellini 
3. Simon Marcus
4. Marc de Bonte
5. Aussie Ouzgni

 

70kg (Per 4/15)
1. Davit Kiriaup
2. Andy Ristiedown
3. Robin van Roosmalendown
4. Giorgio Petrosyandown
5. Murthel Groenhart
6. Buakaw Banchamek
7. Dzhabar Askerov
8. Ky Hollenbeckup
9. Aikprachaup
10. Enriko Kehlup

65kg (per 1/20)
1. Masaaki Noiri
2. Mosab Amraniup
3. Yuta Kubo down
4. Sagetdao
5. Liam Harrison

Video

Initially I was going to post a highlight reel that went up on Mixfight of ten of the top K-1 knockouts in history, and while that is good in theory, if you are coming to LiverKick.com on a regular basis, this is stuff that you should already have in your pocket somewhere. If not, well, have at it. Our good friend Jill puts together some rather awesome highlight packages once in a while, and on occasion when I actually check my Tumblr account I see them and think that the world needs to see them.

All Japan Kickboxing Federation had a very rich history until its untimely death in 2009, while still making sure to keep us happy by splintering off into the KRUSH events that we know and love today. AJKF gave us a lot of top Japanese stars, so why not reflect on it?

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The below is a beautiful display of Muay Thai. Both Buakaw and Petnamek throw beautifully and utilize their technique in rather different strategies to impose their will on the fight.

This bout, in addition to being a fun to watch display of Muay Thai, also serves to highlight a difference in scoring between Muay Thai and kickboxing or Western boxing. Namely, that the judges weigh the last two rounds heavily over the first three. This makes sense on paper, but for those of us who are used to seeing each round weighed equally, it seems strange on viewing.

Of the fighters, Buakaw is undoubtedly more famous, due to his successes in K-1. At this point, he was still fighting in the 135 - 140 lb (61.5 - 63.5 kg) range.  It would be two years before his debut in that organization. He now fights at 154 lb (70 kg), which is also his walk-around weight.

Like Buakaw, Petnamek Sor Siriwat was a well-regarded fighter on the Muay Thai circuits during this time. He too would move up in weight. I believe the most recent footage of him on Youtube showed him participating in Muay Thai vs San Da in 2005.

Buakaw fights out of the blue corner in this bout, Petnamek, southpaw, fights out of the red corner.

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Proof that you don't need to be on a grand stage to have a great fight, here is an unknown fight from a few weeks ago in Thailand that is absolutely a must see.

What you have here is a match in the 46kg (101 lbs) division at the Channel 7 Stadium in Bangkok from February 6.  In the blue is Muangthai Sor Boonyeeam, a 17 year old fighter with a record of 40-18.  In the red, Amata Por Tongboran, age 20, 40-20.  Two very young fighters, neither of whom sports an amazing record, but the end result is simply spectacular.

No joke, you should watch this:

What starts off as a relatively normal Muay Thai opening round picks up immediately at the start of round 2 as Amata comes out fast and furious.  He spends almost the entirety of this 2nd round landing punch after punch, absolutely rocking Muangthai to the point that many refs would have stepped in and called a down.  In the 3rd, Muangthai rallies, connecting with his own shots before landing one of the most beautiful elbow KO's I have ever seen.  Both men show a huge variety of technique here, using elbows, knees, kicks, and punches to show off the full range of what makes Muay Thai so special.  But it's the changes in momentum and the heart shown by both that really sets this fight apart and makes it something special.

We've got a long way to go before the year is done, but don't be surprised if this one shows up on the Fight of the Year ballots when the time comes.

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Hello, people. Here's a short highlight of a knockout for you all. I'm pretty sure this fight happened recently in Italy.

Calzolari is a regional fighter in Italy and has fought recently against Namsaknoi, Kem, and Sudsakorn, among others. Kaoponlek fought at a very high level in Thailand before moving to Europe, holding Lumpini and Rajadamnern titles. I'm not sure where he lives these days, but I'm fairly certain he's overseas.

This video is only a short clip, but it certainly gives a sense of how a "dramatic" KO looks. Kaoponlek wears golden shorts, Calzolari blue.

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Now that we know Badr Hari is returning to action against Tony Gregory for It's Showtime on May 14th, I thought this would be a good time to show one of my all-time favorite fights. When you read that either Badr or Ruslan will be involved in a fight, it's sure to be exciting. Put them both in the same ring and you get fireworks.

In their first meeting, Ruslan knocked out Badr with a right hand in the early stages of the first round. Although they would rematch just five months later, it must have seemed like an eternity for the mighty Moroccan as he surely had revenge on his mind. Badr came into this contest riding a two-fight win streak while Ruslan was coming off of a KO loss to Glaube Feitosa. The timing was just right for Hari to avenge that demoralizing defeat and prove that it was just a fluke.

 

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