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LiverKick.com Rankings


Heavyweight (Per 4/15)
1. Rico Verhoeven
2. Daniel Ghita
3. Gokhan Saki
4. Tyrone Spong
5. Peter Aerts
6. Errol Zimmerman up
7. Benjamin Adegbuyiup
8. Ismael Londt up
9. Hesdy Gerges up
10. Ben Edwards up

Light HW (per 4/15)
1. Gokhan Saki up
2. Tyrone Spong down
3. Danyo Ilunga
4. Nathan Corbett down
5. Saulo Cavalari

Middleweight (per 4/15)
1. Wayne Barrett
2. Joe Schilling
3. Artem Levin
4. Steven Wakeling
5. Franci Grajs

Welterweight (per 4/15)
1. Nieky Holzken 
2. Joseph Valtellini 
3. Simon Marcus
4. Marc de Bonte
5. Aussie Ouzgni

 

70kg (Per 4/15)
1. Davit Kiriaup
2. Andy Ristiedown
3. Robin van Roosmalendown
4. Giorgio Petrosyandown
5. Murthel Groenhart
6. Buakaw Banchamek
7. Dzhabar Askerov
8. Ky Hollenbeckup
9. Aikprachaup
10. Enriko Kehlup

65kg (per 1/20)
1. Masaaki Noiri
2. Mosab Amraniup
3. Yuta Kubo down
4. Sagetdao
5. Liam Harrison

Interviews

K-1's US Grand Prix in Los Angeles went down on last Saturday, September 8 in Los Angeles at the LA Sports Arena. One guest who was present was Eduard Irimia, the owner and promoter of SuperKombat. SuperKombat recently entered a partnership with K-1 and Irimia was on hand to see for himself what the new K-1 had to offer.

Here at LiverKick, we were lucky enough to get an exclusive report from Eduard Irimia on his evaluation of the event and the new K-1 as an organization. Here's what he had to say:

Eduard Irimia: "We decided to come a few days early to Los Angeles to see the logistics that K-1 has. I was not particularly interested in fights, but I was curious about the the technique that K-1 Global has. Knowing how I can do in Europe with SuperKombat, it was important for me to know whether Asia and America are good in regards to logistics for the future, especially for TV and for the public interest of this event.

Basically, the K-1 Global event in Los Angeles was an exam. Even if it seems impossible to get a big attendance with a fight card without big names, it was shown that with proper promotion and marketing, K-1 managed to get 7000 people in the arena.

Frankly, I was surprised to see how many good things they managed to do at K-1 Global fight card with a fight card like this. They took newcomers selected at the tryouts by the beach, without having any fights ever before in kickboxing. For Jarrel Miller I can say that I see a great future, but I noticed Blake, Vigney, and James Wilson, who is like Catalin Morosanu, and they can progress more in the coming years.

K-1 Los Angeles was the perfect time to re-introduce America to this sport, and I can say it was a success. A lot of people expected this to be like a World Grand Prix show from Japan, but the idea was for a pre-selection event in an attempt to discover new heroes and also to excite the interest of Americans. The result was a good one. In Los Angeles, television and newspapers have commented more on this event, even though, again, it was without big names.

As for the impact, I think it was the best K-1 event ever organized in the United States, but not in terms of sports, but in terms of organization. The only negative point that I could mention is the fact that they announced the four winners of the heavyweight fights will go to Tokyo for the Final 16, but have done a match of two veterans face to face instead of a veteran against a rival of the newer wave.

Although there will be some who will criticize the event, I think it was made a good step to the recovery of K-1 in the U.S. market, especially the entertainment aspect as a spectacular athlete like Miller can perform very well. In addition, this was an event preparation for the grand final which will take place on December 26 in New York.

As a novelty, the discussions that we had with Mike Kim, owner of K-1 Global, include an announcement soon with a large television network in China. This after they signed a partnership with Spike, so progress is evident. We will promote the finals in New York and SuperKombat events on 20 October, 10 November and 8 December because we believe in the recovery of K-1.

In the end, beyond the ideas listed at K-1 in Los Angeles, I have to mention that between SuperKombat and K-1 there is a cooperation agreement, and it is not financial. Thus, SuperKombat GP champions will arrive at the K-1 Final 16 and K-1 heroes will fight in SuperKombat to stay in shape before the big event at the end of the year. It’s a reciprocity for this sport to return to its glory years."

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andrei_stoica

We caught up with Andrei Stoica, one half of the SuperKombat stars, the Stoica brothers. Andrei has a fight coming up on October 20 for SuperKombat. We asked him about that and also about the new partnership between SuperKombat and K-1, his brother and training partners and his status as a star in Romania.

LK: Now that SuperKombat and K-1 have a partnership, what do you think about fighting in K-1?

AS: I would be honored to fight in K-1. For me it would be a dream come true! We'll see if the organizers will give me the chance to fight in the K-1 Final 16! I told you, it's my dream!

LK: Usually in SuperKombat you fight at -95kg but now that K-1 has a partnership with SuperKombat, would you fight at heavyweight with much bigger fighters?

AS: For me it's not a problem to fight opponents heavier than me. I always do that! I will try to gain extra pounds and I will be good for heavyweight in the near future!

LK: After the fight with Hakan Aksoy, you said that you were "not yourself" in your previous fights. Can you go into detail about what you meant by that, and why you said that?

AS: I had a difficult period, it is personal and I can not go into detail. I was weak and due to stress, I fought against opponents heavier and the weight difference was observed! But now it will be fine. You will see another Andrei Stoica. I will be in my best shape.

LK: You have a fight on October 20 for SuperKombat, but you will not be able to train with your brother Bogdan for this fight, as he is injured. Will this make much of a difference?

AS: I regret that my brother is injured. It's hard to train without him, but it will motivate me even more and I will train twice as hard. His absence will count but I am optimistic.

LK: What is it like to see your friends and training partners like Benny Adegbuyi be successful lately?

AS: Every one of us will get the chance to be a hero. Now it is Benny's turn. I'm very happy because my colleagues are progressing near me. Also, I get more experience with them. We grow up together.

LK: There is also discussion of the 85kg weight class coming to K-1 soon, maybe next year. You have fought at that weight before, are you able to still make 85kg and willing to fight there if it's in K-1?

AS: If my coach wants me to fight at 85 kg I will. But for now we focus on heavyweight, and we think we do a pretty good job! It's a good initiative to bring this weight category to K-1. For me it is a fascinating class with technique, and strength and speed. What could be better?

LK: SuperKombat has made you a star in Romania, what does that feel like?

AS: I'm glad and I also thank Mr. Irimia who gave me the chance to fight in SuperKombat. I can only say I am glad they are appreciating me in my country and also abroad. I hope the SuperKombat team will continue to do the same job, as they did before.

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Jarrell

K-1 returns on September 8th with the K-1 U.S. Grand Prix in Los Angeles, with an American line up of both old stars and new, K-1 looks to make its biggest impact yet on the United States with its own unique brand of fighting. LiverKick has the pleasure of bringing you, the reader, insight into the mind of one of the newer fighters to the K-1 ring, Jarrell Miller. Over the next four weeks we will be talking with Jarrell and bringing you his thoughts and preparations leading up to his fight against another newcomer to K-1, Jack May. This is week 3.

This week as a big week for K-1, as K-1 and Spike TV announced a multi-platform deal which means that the September 8th show will be streamed live on Spike TV’s website, Spike.com. Spike.com has been airing Bellator MMA events on there and see a healthy amount of traffic, which for this event only means that more eyes will be on it. We asked Jarrell if this changes anything for him.

“Nah, I mean, I’m motivated regardless. Even if this fight was shown in, you know, a hole in the wall I’d be motivated,” he explains. “I’m even more excited knowing that more eyes are on me now. At the end of the day, I know what I gotta do regardless. You know, I got my life on the line here.”

But that wasn’t the only thing that was new for this week for Jarrell, as he has ramped up his training considerably. Originally slated to work with Phil Nurse, they’ve switched up his camp a bit and brought in a new striking coach for him and the focus has been on his kicks, as his hands don’t need the same type of focus.

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Jarrell Miller

K-1 returns on September 8th with the K-1 U.S. Grand Prix in Los Angeles, with an American line up of both old stars and new, K-1 looks to make its biggest impact yet on the United States with its own unique brand of fighting. LiverKick has the pleasure of bringing you, the reader, insight into the mind of one of the newer fighters to the K-1 ring, Jarrell Miller. Over the next four weeks we will be talking with Jarrell and bringing you his thoughts and preparations leading up to his fight against another newcomer to K-1, Jack May. This is week two.

“You know, man, this is my Olympics, you know?” Jarrell Miller, one of the few younger fighters selected for K-1’s American return explained to me. “I came into Boxing and I was already a professional fighter, so I didn’t get to go through the amateur system like some guys do. I didn’t get to go to the Olympics, man. So for me, fighting in K-1, that is like the Olympics for me.”

To say that Jarrell Miller will be prepared for his upcoming bout in Los Angeles is an understatement, I think. Miller, whose Muay Thai and Kickboxing career spans 19 fights now has transitioned to Boxing where he has seen a deal of success in a short period of time. By the time he steps into the ring with Jack May in September, Jarrell Miller will be just about a year removed from his last Kickboxing fight, but he isn’t worried about being rusty.

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Jarrell Miller

K-1 returns on September 8th with the K-1 U.S. Grand Prix in Los Angeles, with an American line up of both old stars and new, K-1 looks to make its biggest impact yet on the United States with its own unique brand of fighting. LiverKick has the pleasure of bringing you, the reader, insight into the mind of one of the newer fighters to the K-1 ring, Jarrell Miller. Over the next four weeks we will be talking with Jarrell and bringing you his thoughts and preparations leading up to his fight against another newcomer to K-1, Jack May.

“Daniel Ghita,” Jarrell told me, without a hint of hesitation in his voice. “If I were looking forward to fighting one guy in this K-1 tournament, it would be Daniel Ghita. I want to whoop Daniel Ghita’s ass, that’s for sure.”

This is how I want to introduce fans to Jarrell Miller. To many, this would seem like an empty boast, part of pre-fight preparations and the process of psyching up to take on the world. Jarrell Miller, though, is a bit of a different case. Jarrell is only 23 years old, and already packs a 19-0 record in Kickboxing and Muay Thai as well as a professional Boxing record of 3-0. There is something to be said for remaining undefeated early on in a professional career, but it isn’t like Jarrell has been without challenge. Jarrell is a man with many nicknames, and if you were lucky enough to catch the WCL - World Combat League - when it was running, you’ll remember him as the 19 year old kid named Achilles King who defeated UFC superstar Pat Barry. That was Jarrell.

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