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LiverKick.com Rankings


Heavyweight (Per 4/15)
1. Rico Verhoeven
2. Daniel Ghita
3. Gokhan Saki
4. Tyrone Spong
5. Peter Aerts
6. Errol Zimmerman up
7. Benjamin Adegbuyiup
8. Ismael Londt up
9. Hesdy Gerges up
10. Ben Edwards up

Light HW (per 4/15)
1. Gokhan Saki up
2. Tyrone Spong down
3. Danyo Ilunga
4. Nathan Corbett down
5. Saulo Cavalari

Middleweight (per 4/15)
1. Wayne Barrett
2. Joe Schilling
3. Artem Levin
4. Steven Wakeling
5. Franci Grajs

Welterweight (per 4/15)
1. Nieky Holzken 
2. Joseph Valtellini 
3. Simon Marcus
4. Marc de Bonte
5. Aussie Ouzgni

 

70kg (Per 4/15)
1. Davit Kiriaup
2. Andy Ristiedown
3. Robin van Roosmalendown
4. Giorgio Petrosyandown
5. Murthel Groenhart
6. Buakaw Banchamek
7. Dzhabar Askerov
8. Ky Hollenbeckup
9. Aikprachaup
10. Enriko Kehlup

65kg (per 1/20)
1. Masaaki Noiri
2. Mosab Amraniup
3. Yuta Kubo down
4. Sagetdao
5. Liam Harrison

Featured Stories

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Watch K-1 The Battle for Spain on Saturday

This Saturday at 19:00 GMT/3PM Eastern K-1 will present The Battle for Spain live and FREE online. You'll be able t...

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Watch GLORY 15 on LK

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The LiverKick.com GLORY 15 Preview and Predictions

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Dida

Andre Dida is one of those guys that most of us know from our time staying up super late to watch Japanese events from here in the United States and rightfully so. Dida cut his teeth in Brazil before being called up by K-1 for their HERO*s organization, where he took place in their first Lightweight GP. Dida, who was a relative unknown to Japanese fans at the time, made it all the way to the Finals. From there he went on to appear in DREAM as well as K-1 MAX.

His K-1 MAX stint was weird, to say the least, as K-1 threw him to the wolves early on, so to speak. His first fight was a crazy KO, so then he was moved up in competition. When I say moved up, I mean that his second K-1 fight was against Buakaw Banchamek (then Por. Pramuk). What was crazy was that he nailed Buakaw with some great shots, Buakaw was a king at the time. Buakaw went on to win via decision in an extra round, but Dida earned some serious respect there. He had two more fights in K-1 after that, both of which were still steep climbs up the talent ranks, against Yuichiro Nagashima and Hinata Watanabe.

Dida announced his return today, claiming that he not only wanted to come back to MMA, but to Kickboxing. I'm not sure that he'd be able to just jump right into the deep waters at 70kg right away, but if GLORY or K-1 were to pick him up they'd be able to build him up until he's comfortable and see where he stands, at least. Dida is planning this comeback with Champions Sports Management based out of Stoney Creek, Ontario, a brand of House of Champions gym, headed by Alin Halmagean and Nenad Kuruc.

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GLORY

GLORY has released the full card for GLORY 16 Denver today, including the one night GLORY Heavyweight Contender tournament as well as the main event between Nieky Holzken and Marc de Bonte. The surprise on the card is that they will be airing the Reserve bout this time around, mostly due to the fact that it is Pat Barry. Pat Barry will be making his GLORY debut on May 3rd in Denver, which is a pretty big deal.

Here's a look at the card.

GLORY 16 DENVER

 

  • Tournament Final Bout C: Semifinal Bout A Winner vs. Semifinal Bout B Winner
  • Welterweight World Title Bout: Nieky Holzken vs. Marc de Bonte
  • Tournament Reserve Bout: Pat Barry vs. Zack Mwekassa
  • Tournament Semifinal Bout B: Anderson Silva vs. Sergey Kharitonov
  • Tournament Semifinal Bout A: Ben Edwards vs. Errol Zimmerman
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K-1

K-1's next event will not be the K-1 World MAX Finals, but instead another trip to Spain featuring some of the Spanish talents that they've helped cultivate over the past year or so. It's a solid move seeing as though their events in Spain have drawn good crowds and gotten a good deal of local press. So K-1 will head to Mallorca, Spain on April 12th for "The Battle for Spain," featuring a headlining bout between Maximo Suarez and Elam Ngor.

Here is the fight card per the press release issued today.

 

  • 70kg: Maximo Suarez (Spain) VS Elam Negor (Spain)
  • 86kg: Denis Marjanivic (Serbia) VS Moises Ruibal (Spain)
  • +100kg: George Collin (Holland) VS Mario Jagatic (Croatia)
  • 63kg: Cristian Barrionueveo (Spain) VS Zakaria Zougarry (Morocco)
  • 70kg: Miodrag Olar (Romania) VS Alejandro Rodriguex (Spain)
  • 95kg: Adam Hart (England) VS Jose IIaneras (Spain)
  • More fights will be added in the coming weeks.

 

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GLORY

Oh man. This weekend GLORY unlocked the entire GLORY 14 event on their website, GloryWorldSeries.com for your viewing pleasure. But if that is too much of a hurdle for you and you have not seen Davit Kiria vs. Andy Ristie for the GLORY Lightweight Championship then you are in for a treat. You can just sit back and watch it here, on LiverKick, thanks to GLORY for uploading it to their YouTube channel. See, they really want you to see this fight and you really should want to see this fight.

Watch it in all of its glory here.

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Saenchai

Muay Thai gear and lifestyle brand, Yokkao, also the masterminds behind the Yokkao Muay Thai events, have reached out to LiverKick today to explain an issue which has caused some confusion for fans. The issue is mainly about Saenchai PKSaenchaimuaythaigym. Saenchai has fought all over the world now, fighting not only in Muay Thai, but Kickboxing as well. This includes a fight for K-1 in December, which has led some to believe that Saenchai is under longterm contract to K-1. Saenchai also appears on GLORY's official rankings in the number seven slot. Yokkao would like to clarify that Saenchai's manager is Yokkao promoter Stefania Picelli and that Saenchai is not under contract to either GLORY or K-1.

Saenchai did indeed fight for K-1, but it was a one-fight contract. Pakorn is also under Stefania Picelli's management and is not signed to either promotion. Yokkao and Stefania Picelli simply wish to clarify this matter and to dispel any of the rumors that have been circulating about both fighters. They can be reached for comment at  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

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Kiria

If you’ve been a kickboxing fan long enough, you must know when a show has that “Dutch” feel to it. There’s pounding trance music, corners frantically yelling at the top of their lungs one second and chanting “Heyyy!!” (along with the crowd) the next, the VIP tables which the Dutch inexplicably prefer to stadium seating, Joop Ubeda snapping at everyone he possibly can, Mike Passenier drinking more of his fighters’ water than they actually do--the list goes on. One of my favorite conceits, however, has always been the advertised nationality of the fighters featured on these shows. At face value, the fighters on an It’s Showtime or old school Golden Glory card hailed from all over the world, from Suriname to Morocco, despite either being born in the Netherlands or having spent most of their life there (It’s Showtime took this conceit to more ludicrous extremes--playing NBC’s Olympic anthems throughout its fights and intermissions). These not-so-foreign fighters also competed with a similar fighting style, employing the Dutch systems practiced in powerhouse gyms like Chakuriki, Mike’s Gym, Golden Glory, Vos, and Meijiro and popularized by the late great Ramon Dekkers. This Dutch style would dominate kickboxing for nearly three decades, from its Muay Thai success in the 80s to its near ubiquity in the pantheon of K-1 champions.

But by 2011, things began to change. The fall of K-1 saw the kickboxing landscape largely shift to the Dutch scene with It’s Showtime and its roster of local prospects leading the way. The stylistic metagame subsequently coalesced around the same Dutch fighting system and the various particularities of its standout fight camps--devolving from an era of diversity which saw the likes of Andy Hug, Mike Bernardo, Glaube Feitosa, Ray Sefo, Masato, and Buakaw fight for the top position of their weight classes. The Chakuriki fighters liked to fight technical, the Mike’s Gym fighters liked to bash each others’ brains in, and everybody liked liver shots and some variation of punching combinations followed by low kicks. In short, the fights got boring, with fighters performing the same old moves on each other with little variation and more importantly, no innovation.

And then there was Giorgio Petrosyan. A petite Armenian with lots of decisions and few KOs to his name, Petrosyan unravelled the Dutch style of kickboxing. He read its tempo, he anticipated its combinations, he internalized its rhythm--and using his exquisite technique he defeated every major Dutch stylist in recent memory, from Albert Kraus to Andy Souwer to the Dutch system’s latest standout, Robin van Roosmalen. Petrosyan’s rising success was soon accompanied by increasing disarray in the Dutch ranks. There was anger, frustration, exasperated remarks of Petrosyan being overrated and boring--a point fighter rather than a fight finisher. And yet no one acknowledged the increasingly apparent reality: that Dutch Kickboxing was becoming increasingly predictable and exploitable.

Meanwhile, Andy Ristie ravaged It’s Showtime’s entry and mid-level ranks with his “unorthodox” fighting style that combines KO power and clever technique with his tall, lanky frame. While never flawless, Ristie’s style seemed to pose a darkhorse threat to the top, a threat which was finally realized when Ristie sent Petrosyan and van Roosmalen thundering to the canvas. In both fights, Ristie broke his opponents’ rhythm and form, slipping curving punches through the guard which found their mark. In one fell swoop, Andy Ristie turned the lightweight division upside down and singlehandedly breathed more life into kickboxing than it had since the Masato-Buakaw era.

The end result is a revitalized metagame that is being defined by innovation and the unravelling of kickboxing orthodoxy. The era of Ramon Dekkers is over. The future will see the arrival of more Petrosyans and Andy Risties--fighters whose diverse abilities take the game to new heights while upsetting the norm. It’s also not insignificant that both Cor Hemmers and Thom Harinck have retired at this time, opening the field for new coaching talent from around the world to make their names. Davit Kiria vs. Andy Ristie is only a taste of the type of fight to come: cerebral, intellectual, suspenseful, with glimmering strokes of artistry and sweet science rather than the concussive, brain rattling thunder of Meat Day. This is kickboxing at its best, and if you’re a fan, then you should welcome the evolution of the sport into the more fully realized competition of striking arts that it always promised to be.

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