Switch to desktop Register Login

LiverKick - LiverKick

Jose Aldo and Frankie Edgar at UFC 136: Dissecting Striking Concepts in MMA

Jose AldoThe sport of Mixed Martial Arts began as a concept that pit practitioners of different forms of martial arts against each other. Eventually in the United States, this led to fighters starting to cross-train in other forms of martial arts to help defend against certain techniques or simply add it to their repertoire. The UFC and MMA have grown a lot from the early UFC events (we aren’t going to touch Japan, different beast entirely), to where MMA has almost become a style of its own, just as it has become a sport of its own.

At UFC 136 there were two championship fights, and both showed different displays of striking prowess, with one fight ending in a decision and one fight ending in a knockout. What I find interesting to take away from the event is how Dana White was quick to declare Frankie Edgar as the best “Boxer” in the UFC and how quickly fans and media followed suit, with many declaring Frankie one of the elite strikers in the MMA world. I have to admit that I was taken aback, as after watching the Jose Aldo fight and how it was an impressive display of striking, I did not feel the same thing about the Edgar fight. The only difference to the naked eye was that the Edgar fight finished with a knockout, while Aldo took Florian to a decision.

What needs to be established first and foremost is that knockouts happen in combat sports, and a knockout does not always mean a superior display of “striking.” Fighters like Joey Beltran and Leonard Garcia are fighters who primarily like to strike in their recent fights and put on strike-heavy fights at UFC 136, but I’m not sure I’d rate either as a very good striker. Beltran holds eleven wins by knockout and Garcia has three, and both men are quick to turn fights into brawls that showcase a lot of heart and wild punches, but that does not make for a good striker, and I feel like many understand this concept in these scenarios. People like watching Leonard Garcia fight, but not many will say he is a great technical striker.

What needs to be established next is that “Boxing,” “Muay Thai” and “Kickboxing” are not lone attributes in a fighter’s toolbox. They are not videogame-like attributes that are assigned and can simply be explained as, “they have good Boxing.” Many have been lauding over Frankie Edgar’s boxing skills through simple phrases like, “Frankie Edgar’s Boxing is Great,” or “Frankie Edgar has the best Boxing in MMA.”

Boxing, Muay Thai, Kickboxing, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Wrestling, Judo and everything else in the MMA universe are sports and styles unto themselves, and include many, many facets to them. Frankie Edgar knows how to move out of harm’s way and not get hit and he also has very sound technique when it comes to throwing his strikes. On the other side of the coin, he drops his left hand a lot or doesn’t keep it in tight near his chest to defend his chin, leaving him open to take damage from time to time, while his head is also mostly stationary. Another thing to note is that he also tends to focus on the head when he strikes, rarely changing levels.

Continue Reading....


TaKe On Productions October 22nd Full Thai Rules in Atlantic City

TKO ProductionsThe world of Muay Thai in the United States is a bit of an odd one at times, as there is some fragmentation. For a while now there have been regions where Muay Thai is incredibly hot and there are local promoters doing great things. Los Angeles and the Bay Area have been there, as is Las Vegas and especially in the past few years, New York. New York has best been known for Friday Night Fights, the long-running Muay Thai promotion run by the Church Street Boxing gym.

We've seen a new promotion rise up recently and begin to do big, awesome things, and that is TaKe On Productions. TKO Productions has been running since 2009 and has been picking up steam ever since. TaKe On has a big Muay Thai show coming up on October 22nd at Bally's Grand Ballroom in Atlantic City. TKO Productions has had eleven big sell out shows in a row before striking out to Atlantic City, working now with MSG Sports (Madison Square Garden). This event will also be streamed live on, and unlike a lot of other promotions who have gone that route, the card will be $9.95, as opposed to upwards of $25, which is a smart price point for an event like this. I'm looking forward to TaKe On Productions doing bigger and better things in the future.

Full press release with details on the event after the break.

Don't forget to check out their website for details on the card and more news.



Krush Announces 2 Fights for Krush.13: Krush vs Europe

Though Krush has yet to put together any title fights after the conclusion of their four tournaments, they have kept their champions busy. Earlier today, Krush announced that their next event, Krush.13, will take place on November 12th and will feature two of their champions in super fights against European fighters.

First, 60kg champion Hirotaka Urabe will fight in his third super fight since winning the 60kg tournament, this time against Mike's Gym's Maik Redan. Redan is just 17 years old and trains with the likes of Artur Kyshenko, Badr Hari and Melvin Manhoef. Urabe has won back to back super fights in Krush against Chinese fighters and is currently on a 5-fight win streak.

Krush also announced that their 55kg champion, Shota Takiya, will take on UK Muay Thai fighter Damien Trainor. Trainor has won various UK and European Muay Thai titles throughout his career. Takiya is currently on a 6-fight win streak and since his tournament win, took a win over KO-ICHI by first round stoppage.

Krush also announced that they wanted to do a 3rd Japan vs Europe fight for the event, but haven't confirmed a fighter for either slot. {jcomments on}


Evaluating Gokhan Saki's Move Into Boxing

As you may or may not know by now, Gokhan Saki has stated that after his January 28 fight with Badr Hari, he'll head to boxing. While Saki didn't confirm if he would be done kickboxing for good, the thought of Gokhan Saki giving boxing a go is an interesting avenue. He revealed the news in an interview with and subsequently fired shots at some of boxing's best in the heavyweight division. Among many of the things he had to say, here is one quote that I examine in a different light:

"Heavyweight boxing nowadays is very pitiful. The Klitschko brothers are very smart guys and very professional athletes. Nevertheless, both of them I will fight and they won't make the 12th round."

Now, upon reading this quote, it's apparent that Saki wants to go straight forward into the heavyweight division. He's fought his entire career in kickboxing as an undersized heavyweight because the pinnacle of the sport, K-1, only has the open weight heavyweight division. Other divisions like -95kg and -85kg just don't have the money behind them like the K-1 World Grand Prix does (or technically did) at one point. In boxing, Saki would have an opportunity to fight in the cruiserweight division, in which the weight limit is 200 lbs, yet he seems to want to fight at heavyweight. It's not a surprising choice, as heavyweight just has that significant air about it and cruiserweight is one of the least popular weight divisions.

At cruiserweight though, Saki would actually not be at a size disadvantage for once. This would probably benefit him in the power department as well. Though he would have a speed advantage over heavyweights, the size difference is just a literally huge thing to overcome. Also like the heavyweight division, cruiserweight is quite shallow.

Cruiserweight is not the dead division that some like to point out also. While it is one of the least popular divisions, Germany has taken the cruiserweights as their own. A few notable cruiserweights are based out of Germany: Marco Huck, Enad Licina and Yoan Pablo Hernandez. Marco Huck always draws great crowds with good television ratings while Yoan Pablo Hernandez fought just this past weekend against Steve Cunningham, another top cruiserweight and there was a great crowd on hand. Mind you that the fight was on a card with other stars of German boxing, something that can be capitalized on for the division. Most of the top cruiserweight fights take place in Germany and with a large Turkish population, its not out of the question that Saki could develop a following in Deutschland. He could even possibly fight in Turkey, where

Now this is all just hypothetical talk. As far as Saki's chances of making it big in boxing, the odds are stacked against him, much like they are with Badr Hari. Going from kickboxing to boxing is completely changing in ring factors such as footwork and distance with the absence of kicks and knees. These aren't just things that will be adjusted quickly either. There's so many variables between the two sports; more than you would think. One can't just stop throwing kicks and knees and expect to be able to just fight with hands. Modern kickboxing, the Dutch style especially, emphasizes less movement which is really an essential factor of boxing. It's normal in Dutch kickboxing for fighters to stand in front of one another and just take turns trading shots. Stuff like that just doesn't work a technical boxer.

It's going to be a long road for guys like Badr Hari and Gokhan Saki to be at the top of boxing; a road that seems improbable. We'll never know until it happens though. Who would've expected that Matt Skelton, not even a top guy in K-1 would go on to have quite a respectable boxing career, winning the British and European heavyweight titles at one point, even challenging for a world title once at such an old age for a fighter? Nothing is impossible and we at wish Gokhan Saki the best in his move to boxing.


Copyright 2010 - 2014 All Rights Reserved.

Top Desktop version