LiverKick

Switch to desktop Register Login

LiverKick - LiverKick

Fighter Spotlight: Penthai Singpatong & Songkom Sakhomsin

The light flyweight division in Thailand is one of the most competitive classes in the country. Two of the of the better fighters at this weight are Penthai Singpatong and Songkom Sakhomsin. Penthai is currently the 3rd ranked fighter at Lumpinee stadium and Songkom is #1. With the current champion now fighting at around 115 pounds its likely the title is vacated and perhaps these two could compete for it in the near future.

Penthai is 22, which is fairly old for such a small weight. He stands at 5'3 and has a really good all around style. Last December he lost a heart breaking decision to Kengkla Sor. Chokkitichai for the Channel 7 title, but got a rematch the following month and took the belt in another very close, and thrilling fight. He still maintains that title but most of his fights now are happening at Rajadamnern and Lumpinee. 

Songkom Sakhomsin has exploded on to the scene recently and is smashing most of his competition. In his last eight fights he's 7-1 with 5 KO's. The loan loss comes at a low weight that does not suit him well. At just 16 he seems to be getting better every time out, and his left uppercut has become his signature technique. He fights similar to how Yodsanklai fought when he was a teen. 

Read more...

A subjective look at the 12 best Thai boxers in the world.

With the formation of the Muay Thai premier league, shows starting to pop up in the U.S, and notable events happening almost every week in Europe, boxing in Thailand seems to have taken a backseat. Buakaw Por. Pramuk, Kem Sitsongpeenong, Sudsakorn Sor. Klinmee, Yodsanklai Fairtex etc... are the Thai fighters that get most of the attention because they frequently fight outside of the country. However they are nowhere near the best fighters in Thailand. I don't know if its because the best fighters are genetically smaller than "international level" fighters, or because people stereotype stadium boxing as a type of sameness, but for some reason or another Muay Thai in Thailand is viewed as something that is just... there, and nothing more for a lot of people. The best Thai boxers in the world are all 132 pound and under Thai's. I'm not bitter, just perplexed as to why the best fighters minus Saenchai aren't getting a fair shake, or even attention. 

 

1. Saenchai Sinbimuaythai: It's impossible to not have Saenchai at #1. The guy has proven time and time again that he is the best stand up fighter on the planet. One week he'll go to another country at 140 pounds and dominate, 2 weeks later he'll get down to 127 and teach the hottest fighter in Thailand a boxing lesson. Vision, speed, balance, technique, he has it all. At 31 and 300 fights to his name you'd think the decline would have started by now, but if anything he's getting better and plans to fight for 4 or 5 more years. Next month he's scheduled to fight F16 Rajanont at the Lumpinee birthday show where he'll be giving up a full weight class to F16. 

2. Sam-A Kaiyanghadaogym: In a recent interview from mymuaythai Ponsaneh Sitmonchai was asked who his hardest opponent has been, and without pausing he said Sam-A. Not surprising as Sam-A has beaten him 3/4 times with the reason for the loan loss being from a slip that was ruled a count. Sam-A is old for a Thai boxer at 28, but its not surprising to see him still at such a high level. He's a technical master who now very rarely ever gets hit with a clean shot. Pad's don't hit back, but you can generally get a good idea of what level a fighter is at by the speed and balance a fighter has when kicking pads. This video came out just before his fight with Kongsak earlier this year and I don't know that I've ever seen someone kick pads as good as Sam-A. His next fight is also scheduled for the Lumpinee birthday card next month against Rittidej Wor. Wanthavee. If he wins he'll end the year with an 8-0-1 record.

  

Read more...

The Most Decorated Team of Stand Up Trainers in the World

Namsaknoi with a collection of his belts

Historically ambitious stand up fighters have flocked to Thailand to learn at the hands of legends like Namsaknoi Yudthagarngamtorn and Anuwat Kaewsamrit but now an increasing number of renowned Muay Thai fighters are moving to Singapore.

Evolve MMA is putting together a collection of trainers which is unprecedented in the history of Muay Thai and includes Orono Wor Petchpun, Attachai Fairtex, Lamnammoon Sor Sumalee, Kongtoranee Payakaroon and Muangfalek Kitvichian as well as Namsaknoi and Anuwat. These are all names which live on long after their owners have retired because they belong to the very best fighters in the most competitive stand up sport on the planet.

Any fighter who wants to acquire world class stand up skils, be it for K-1, kickboxing, Muay Thai or even MMA would be well advised to come and learn from one of these Thai legends. The fighters currently at Evolve MMA include Shinya Aoki, Leandro Issa and Eddie Ng and with such a decorated team of trainers it is no wonder that their stand up skills are improving rapidly.

You could not find a team of Muay Thai fighters, past or present, anywhere else in the world to match the one currently in place at Evolve MMA and there is not even a camp in Thailand which can boast so many high calibre trainers.

Kru Yodtong Senanan is the grandmaster of the world renowned Sityodtong camp and the only teacher of Muay Thai to be awarded a lifetime achievement award by the Royal Family of Thailand. According to him the number of top Thai trainers moving to Singapore is starting to raise eyebrows in Thailand,

"Evolve MMA has the most number of Muay Thai World Champions in the world, including camps in Thailand. No camp has this many legends and champions and it is the most decorated team that I have seen in my 50 years of teaching Muay Thai."

Namsaknoi was a two time fighter of the year and a Lumpini champion at three different weights. Anuwat Kaewsamrit was a two time fighter of the year, a three time Rajadamnern champion and a Lumpini champion, WBC champion and WMC champion. Orono Wor Petchpun was a WMC champion, Lumpini champion and Thailand champion.

Orono Wor Petchpun shows off his silverware

Lamnammoon Sor Sumalee was a four time Lumpini champion, Kongtoranee Payakaroon was fighter of the year and won a Lumpini title at an incredible five different weight classes while Muangfalek Kitvichian is a two time Rajadamnern champion. Another Evolve MMA instructor, Yodsanan Sityodtong, has also fought Muay Thai at a very high level as well as beng a former WBA Super Featherweight boxing champion.

With so much money in MMA it is surprising that more of the top camps have not invested in bringing in elite Muay Thai trainers. The science of stand up fighting inside the cage is still evolving and there is absolutely no substitute for the experience that a lifetime of fighting in Thaiiland brings, most of the trainers listed in this article have over 300 fights and at least two decades experience of training and competing.

If mixed martial artists want to reach a level of striking which is so far unprecedented in their sport then they need look no further than Muay Thai to find it. There is such a wealth of knowledge inside Thailand that there are still many tricks and techniques that remain undiscovered within the world of MMA. Evolve MMA is the first facility to really focus on extricating some of the most accomplished trainers from Thailand and the likes of Shinya Aoki and Eddie Ng are reaping the benefits. 

For more information about Muay Thai at Evolve MMA visit: http://evolve-mma.com/classes/muay-thai.html

Just the one belt for former WBA Super Featherweigth champion Yodsanan Sityodtong

Read more...

The MuayThai Premier League: Room For Improvement

mpl

I finally got around to watching the MuayThai Premiere League's second event on TV that I had PVR'd from last night. The fights were great and filled with action. I'm going to focus on the actual production  and promotional aspects of the promotion. This was my first time watching the MPL on TV and I came away thinking that there is some room for improvement in their production values and promotion.

The show itself is pretty standard: Introductions, fights, post fight interview, repeat. There's not really any connection made to the fighters, no actual promotion of the fighters themselves on the broadcast. I myself don't mind as I have no problem with just standard fights but I can't help but feel that other people who watched the event feel a real pull towards a fighter. Sure, fighting speaks for itself and the fights were great but many are drawn in by personalities. There was really no showcase of individual personalities aside from a short, somewhat awkward post-fight interview. Most notably, they definitely missed the boat on promoting Ky Hollenbeck who is one of the top American fighters in Muay Thai. Fans can relate to someone from their home country competing on the world stage.

The event was definitely a missed opportunity for promotion. How is anyone supposed to know or care if there are no means of watching? The only place the event was broadcast was in Canada on The Score where I watched. Eurosport just got around to airing the first event. There's virtually no internet buzz.

In terms of the actual setting, it should be altered for a better viewing experience. The dark ring canvas along with the whole crowd seemingly blacked out (probably to hide the poor attendance) isn't very viewer-friendly. The setting needs to be brightened up a bit. It's a bit like Bellator's problem where the cage colours create a dull appearance but in this case, the setting is very contrasted.

As for commentary, Mauro Ranallo is cool and all for MMA but the reality is he just isn't that knowledgable about Muay Thai. He's out of his element. It also seems to me that the commentary is more kickboxing oriented than Muay Thai. This can be attributed to there being a lot of kickboxing stylists in the MPL but not enough attention is given to important aspects of Muay Thai like clinch striking, throws and overall dominance. These were really only highlighted a few times over the whole broadcast. Most of the time it seemed that punches were getting the most attention scoring-wise for the commentary team when they aren't valued as much as the other weapons in the arsenal of a nak muay.The judging seems to lean more towards kickboxing too, but that's a whole other story.

Do I like the MPL? Yes, I do but they have their flaws and this is just what I think they can improve on. Their format is great and the right idea is there. Hopefully they can make improvements to bring their product to the next level.

 

Read more...

Copyright 2010 - 2017 LiverKick.com. All Rights Reserved.

Top Desktop version