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Exclusive Simon Rutz Interview

  • Published in Interviews

SimonRutzAmidst all the bad K-1 news, Europe’s top fighting organization, It’s Showtime, has been a hot topic of conversation lately.  As plans for 2011 come together, we’re seeing more and more events announced by the company, who find themselves constantly expanding their product throughout the world.  But in the middle of all the positive news came an unfortunate announcement last week – due to a planned co-promotion with K-1 falling through, It’s Showtime would not run their big annual show at the Amsterdam Arena in 2011.

Between this latest news, all the rumors swirling around K-1, Badr Hari’s return, and various other stories, now seemed like a good time to speak to the always forthcoming It’s Showtime president Simon Rutz.  As always, Mr. Rutz offered plenty of insight into their dealings with K-1 and so much more.

Read on for part 1 of this 2 part exclusive LiverKick.com interview, as we get the story on exactly what happened with the canceled Amsterdam Arena event and the state of affairs for K-1 and It’s Showtime.

LiverKick.com: It’s a shame you may not run in the Amsterdam Arena this year. When did you begin to think this show might not happen?

Simon Rutz: We have already known for many years that K-1 has big problems, but a few months ago they said to me that they have a new investor.  That was the reason why I agreed to cooperate on the Amsterdam Arena event in May this year.  Around Christmas I felt that there was something wrong with their situation because they didn’t answer my requests anymore.

LK: What were the plans for the show? Did you have fighters already lined up?

SR: When It’s Showtime and K-1 cooperate I always give my suggestions, and most of the time they use them.  My suggestions for this year were: Badr Hari vs. Gokhan Saki; Peter Aerts vs. Tyrone Spong; and Hesdy Gerges vs. Alistair Overeem, Errol Zimmerman, or someone else.

LK: We’ve heard a lot about K-1 not paying fighters, and I know Giorgio Petrosyan had problems with that last year. Are there It’s Showtime or Black Label fighters who are waiting to be paid by K-1?

SR: Yes, the following fighters have not been paid for a fight: Melvin Manhoef, Tyrone Spong, Daniel Ghita, Hesdy Gerges, Gago Drago, Pajonsuk, Dzevad Poturak, Chahid, and Giorgio Petrosyan still needs his win bonus from the last K-1 MAX tournament.  It is a lot of money! I never let our fighters fight before they are paid for their last fight.  I hear that some other fighters haven’t gotten their money for 4 fights.  It is a sad situation for all the fighters.

LK:  Given all these problems, what, in your opinion, does K-1 need to do to survive?

SR: They need a lot of money, and they must ask my advice (and do something with that advice) because they do a lot of stupid things.

LK: If they don’t get that money, and they don’t survive, what will it mean for kickboxing and for It’s Showtime?

SR: If they don’t survive it is very bad for the sport and for many fighters.  For It’s Showtime, it would mean that we are the number 1 kickboxing organization in the world and everybody will look to us.  We are getting busy like never before.  We have already seen a movement from K-1 to It’s Showtime.  Almost every day I talk with people around the world who want to organize an It’s Showtime event in their country.

LK: Would you ever consider buying out K-1?

SR: Why should I do that?  I have my own brand and company who is healthy and is going very well.  Also, what am I buying then?  Only a lot of problems!  The [K-1] name is very strong, but I already have a good name.  I will keep my money in my pocket!

LK: You said you are talking with people around the world, and this looks like a huge year for you with new events in England, Germany, and Spain. Any details on those shows?

SR: Our schedule for the year is now: March 6 – Amsterdam, Holland; March 26 – Brussels, Belgium; May 14 – Lyon, France (not signed yet); May – Manheim, Germany (not signed yet); June 11 – Warsaw, Poland; July 23 – Sochi, Russia; August 27 – Sarajevo, Bosnia; September 18 – Amsterdam, Holland; September 24 – Manchester, England (not signed yet); October 8 – Geneva, Switzerland; End of December in Amsterdam for the It’s Showtime Christmas Edition again.  We are also talking about It’s Showtime events in Spain, Ukraine, and Australia.  As you see, we are really busy.  We have at least 10 big events this year, maybe 12.

LK: You know I have to ask – any further info on possibly running in the United States?

SR: I am getting more and more interest for It’s Showtime events in the US.  Last week, one of the TV stations from the US bought our It’s Showtime events, so that is starting.  I also am speaking with several people to see what the possibilities are in the US.  But when we start, we will start slowly with events for 2,000 people.

LK:  With all this expansion, where do you want It’s Showtime to be in 2 years?

SR: Pff......... 6 months ago I said that in 5 years It’s Showtime would organize between 15 and 20 events a year, but we are going so fast, maybe next year we will already be doing 15 events a year!

Check back tomorrow for the conclusion of this interview as we discuss Remy Bonjasky’s retirement, Cosmo Alexandre, the Hesdy Gerges/Semmy Schilt controversy, and of course, Badr Hari.

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Simon Rutz Interview Part 2

  • Published in Interviews

Simon RutzAmidst all the bad K-1 news, Europe’s top fighting organization, It’s Showtime, has been a hot topic of conversation lately. As plans for 2011 come together, we’re seeing more and more events announced by the company, who find themselves constantly expanding their product throughout the world. But in the middle of all the positive news came an unfortunate announcement last week – due to a planned co-promotion with K-1 falling through, It’s Showtime would not run their big annual show at the Amsterdam Arena in 2011.

Between this latest news, all the rumors swirling around K-1, Badr Hari’s return, and various other stories, now seemed like a good time to speak to the always forthcoming It’s Showtime president Simon Rutz. As always, Mr. Rutz offered plenty of insight into their dealings with K-1 and so much more.

If you missed part 1 yesterday, click here for the story on exactly what happened with the canceled Amsterdam Arena event and the state of affairs for K-1 and It’s Showtime.

LiverKick.com Exclusive Interview with Simon Rutz Part 2

LiverKick.com: It’s very exciting to hear Badr Hari will return in May in Lyon. Is that fight confirmed?

Simon Rutz: It is not confirmed yet because the contract is not signed, but I think we will have the contract signed in 2 weeks.

LK: Any news on his return opponent?

SR: At this moment we are talking with possible opponents.

LK: Where do his legal troubles stand?

SR: Nobody knows what will happen in the future with this case! This case was big in the news in The Netherlands, but from what I understand, the police still don’t have any witnesses.

LK: So do you have concerns about Hari’s reputation considering the trouble kickboxing recently had with the government in Amsterdam?

SR: Of course it doesn’t help! But these are two totally different cases. Amsterdam wants to have big sports events in their city, but with one of the biggest events (It’s Showtime), they make it difficult. When we don’t run show in the future in Amsterdam, it will be a shame for the city, but not for It’s Showtime. We will survive with or without Amsterdam.

LK: Remy Bonjasky is working with It’s Showtime now. Have you discussed him having a retirement fight with you?

SR: Yes, I discussed a retirement fight for him, but the money he asked for I don’t want to pay! Of course he can ask, but believe me, nobody will pay him that much money!

LK: How did you feel about K-1’s response to the protest regarding the Hesdy Gerges vs. Semmy Schilt fight?

SR: What they said and did was bullshit. They say that the corner for Schilt was wrong, and they punished the judges? I understand why K-1 did this, because last year they didn’t get Badr Hari and Remy Bonjasky, so they needed the 4 time K-1 winner Semmy Schilt in the final. I think if Hesdy Gerges was in the final, it would have been a totally different final.

LK: You had an unfortunate falling out with Cosmo Alexandre last year. Why couldn’t that situation be worked out?

SR: Because it was the second time he did something wrong. But for me there’s no problem. He is a nice guy and a good fighter, but I don’t use him anymore.

LK: I understand your clause regarding fighters taking fights before It’s Showtime shows – is that written in to their contracts?

SR: It’s always written in their contract, but with Cosmo, we didn’t write the contract because, stupid as I am sometime, a word from me is more important than a contract. But don’t misunderstand me, in 99% of the cases we have a contract!

LK: Tyrone Spong is no longer the 95kg champ. Any idea when there will be a fight for that title, and who might fight for it?

SR: Yes, I am working on that and I think that 2 fighters are fighting for this title on March 6 in Amsterdam. Soon I will let everybody know.

LK: Melvin Manhoef said on twitter that he likely won’t fight for It’s Showtime this year. Might he be stripped of the 85kg belt?

SR: If he doesn’t fight for his title, yes I will strip him of the belt because those are the rules! But Melvin is Melvin, one day he says that and the other day he thinks differently. Also, if he doesn’t fight this year for It’s Showtime and K-1 is broke, who else can pay him? Last time Melvin was disappointed because K-1 didn’t treat him well and that’s the case.

LK: What are your personal favorite fights in It’s Showtime history?

SR: Badr Hari vs. Sem Schilt, Mootje Khamal vs. Chahid, Ivan Hipolyte vs. Rayen Simson, Rob Kaman vs. Alexei Ignashov, and almost all the fights from Gago Drago.

LK: Last year when I spoke to you and asked who we should watch for in 2010, you brought up Aussi Ouzgni, who then had a great year. So, who should we watch out for in 2011?

SR: Marat Grigorian is one of the biggest talents in the world. Watch him.

LK: Anything else our readers should know?

SR: A lot of people think that It’s Showtime is happy that K-1 is broke, but believe me we hope that K-1 survives. That’s really better for the sport. Also personally I like the people from FEG like Mr. Tanikawa, but in my opinion they do a lot of strange things. For many years I have said to them that they must do things differently but every time they do the opposite. I think that they were afraid of It’s Showtime, but that is totally not necessary. The world is big enough for two good and big kickboxing organizations. Also, I want to say that life is beautiful! Carpe Diem!

 

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A Few Questions With Glory Middleweight Israel "The Last Style Bender" Adesanya

  • Published in Interviews

Earlier this week we were lucky enough to get to chat with Israel Adesanya and ask few questions before his King in The Ring 8 man tournament in Auckland, NZ on August 30th. Israel is the first fighter from New Zealand to sign with Glory and is the current WKBF Cruiser & Light Heavyweight, IKBF Cruiserweight and WMC Oceania Cruiserweight Champion.

LK: Hi Israel, first of all tell us your fight stats, height, weight, record, etc?

IA: Fight record is 34 wins/ 2 losses/ 0 draws/ 16kos, Height: 190cm/6'3", Weight: 84kg/185lbs, Stance: Orthodox, Age: 25yrs old.

LK: What nickname do u go by? I've heard Style bender?

IA: The last Style Bender. Lol big fan of cartoons, 1 of my faves being the Avatar series. Love the story behind it and the idea of me being the last of my kind, so I have to master all the elements of fighting to realize my destiny as the Avatar.

LK: You have an 8 man tournament coming up Aug 30 in Auckland, hows training going, how are you feeling?

IA: Yup for King in the Ring. I'm feeling great man, all I do is train eat sleep and repeat. I could fight tomorrow that's how ready I am.

LK: Do you know any of the other opponents? Who do you think is the best man in the tournament after you of course?

IA: Yup a lot of the guys in the tournament are friends of mine. We've traveled and trained together for years. But it makes no difference, I've had fights with my brothers and sister growing up. I'd fight anyone! I'd fight my grandma even...but she's dead. Makes no difference who has the bad luck to face me that night, I'll pull no punches and I expect them to come at me. I'm not the defending King in the Ring champ, but I know these boys all wanna beat up the Glory fighter. So that keeps me sharp.

LK: What do you think of the 8 man tournament format? Do you like it better than a single fight?

IA: I like the spectacle of it. 7 men will fall and 1 will rise, it's so throwback. But I prefer to have a single fight for the most part. 8 man tournaments are taxing on the body. I won my 1st 1 in 2010 for the IKBF 8man.

LK: You train at City Kickboxing, is that where you first started training? How's the attitude/ atmosphere/sparring partners?

IA: I started in TKD as a kid. Stopped for almost or over 10 years then training in Wanganui New Zealand with Derek Broughton. Then decided to move to the big smoke of Auckland city after visiting City Kickboxing on a road trip. One of the best decisions to train at City Kickboxing with Eugene Bareman and Doug Viney.

LK: I have to ask about your fight with Simon Marcus, how did you feel about that decision?

IA: Man, I know, the people know, and Simon knows he didn't win that fight. He hit me with 2 clean punches the whole fight, I rocked him twice and he wanted cuddles, I bent around all his strike attempts and hit him clean more times in the fight while doing the moonwalk. He'll get this work soon...hopefully on the Glory stage so the world can witness!

LK: How did you find the experience of your first Glory fight?

IA: It was awesome! Turkey was dope. I wasn't nervous at all cuz in China I did 15000 seat shows, so this was nothing. I should have embraced the nerves a bit and stayed true to my style rather than charge him in the opening round. But Verlinden used strong basics and years of experience to keep me at gear to and steal momentum, I respect that... but he still couldn't break me and I know without a doubt I can beat him.

LK: Any talks with Glory about about your next fight?

IA: Yup, classified at the moment. But it's coming soon and I can't wait to make my USA debut. The world gon' luuuurn haha!

LK: What got you into kickboxing in the first place? How old were you? Did you ever imagine you would be at this level?

IA: I was 17, I saw the movie Ong Bak and months after started training Muay Thai. Had my 1st novice fight within 6 weeks and my 2nd fight ever was full thai rules (and won). After UFC 90 witnessing the way Anderson Silva beat Coté, I had the misconception of fighters/ action heroes movies and media put on us shattered. Soon after I made the decision to be the best in the world and I moved to Auckland.

LK: Last question is something I like to ask every great fighter

Hardest puncher you've fought? IA: I don't take many shots in fights, but Doug Viney spars like a mad man and had hit me full clip a full times and I still stand.

Hardest Kicker you've fought? IA: Jamie Eades in a novice fight in 2008/2009. He made me realize to check leg kicks, but I returned the favour years later in a full Thai fight and had him limping with a gangsta lean.

Hardest fight? IA: Still waiting...

Favourite Fighter? IA: Anderson Silva, Mohammed Ali, Prince Naseem, Roy Jones jr, Rickson Gracie, Conor McGregor, Nick Diaz...etc the list can go on. I'm a fan of combat sports

LK: Thanks a lot for your time Israel, is there anything more you would like to say to your fans, sponsors etc?

IA: Just wanna thank those that have followed and believed in me through all this, my training partners, my sponsors Bow Fighters, FX Nutrition, Combat Kings, Stained Skin Tattoos. Stay tuned for this man, just getting started.

LK: Once again thank you, good luck on your upcoming fight, not that you need it.

 

 

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Exclusive Interview with Marco Tentori

  • Published in Interviews

We had a chance to speak with Australian Muay Thai champion and Kung Fu specialist Marco Tentori before his biggest fight to date against "Stone Cold" Steve Moxon. Marco did beat Frankie Giorgi in December of last year, and Giorgi holds a win over Moxon but Moxon has been very active fighting big names. So it will be a tough test, that Tentori is more than willing to take on.

LK: Ok first off lets start with your fight record, height, weight, stance?

MT: Current fight record 26 wins 6 losses(but i dispute some) 8 KO's. Height: 179cm / 5feet 10.5 inches. Weight: middleweight 160lbs/72.5kg, though this is the middleweight class in pro Muay Thai & boxing, it would be closer to the welterweight div for MMA & Glory. Stance: variable. Age - 30

LK: Do you have any nicknames? If so whats the story behind it?

MT: Machine Gun, Alan Pond gave it to me the promoter who put the shows on for which I fought my first few fights (though now he is my coach). He had a habit of giving nicknames when a fighter didn't have one to help with the promotion of shows. He nicknamed me "Machine Gun" due to my high work rate and it stuck

LK: You are in Australia, have you been there your whole life? Trained in any other countries?

MT: Yes I have been here my whole life and only trained and fought in Australia, though keen to get out & fight internationally. Can be difficult to get fights in other countries due to our location.

LK: You have a big fight with Steve Moxon coming up in two and a half weeks, hows training and how are you feeling?

MT: Training is going great! So far one of the best camps I have had. I am feeling as good as ever and feel ready to go right now! Like a hungry wolf being held back on a leash. I can't wait to get in there.

LK: I noticed that you have already beat names like Frankie Giorgi but do you think Moxon will be the biggest test?

MT: Given Moxon's level of competition & activity I would say that he would be the biggest test so far, although Frankie Giorgi did beat Moxon not too long ago. I am not phased by Moxon's reputation or record, I welcome the chance to challenge him.

LK: So, i was told your main fighting style is Kung Fu, what type, what gym do you train at and have you been there from the start of your training?

MT: My background & base is Buk Sing Choy Lay Fut. I started my training in this style at the Chinese Kung Fu & Tai Chi Academy. For my first few fights I trained solely out of this gym & in that style, but since there were no full contact kung fu tournaments here at the time I jumped in & fought muay thai instead. A kung fu guy fighting against muay thai under their rules, not something that happens too often. While I was winning I had some holes in my game so Alan Pond invited me over to spar & do some training in his gym. Since then I have been based out of both gyms, the kung fu school & Alan Ponds gym, splitting training between both.

LK: What age did you start at the Chinese Kung Fu Academy? Also whats the name of Alan Ponds gym?

MT: As a teenager, around 14 years old. Alan's gym is the Midland Martial Arts & Ultimate Fitness Center, formerly the Chinese Boxing Club (his background being western boxing & Kung Fu, off the top of my head he had around 78 fights between boxing & thai boxing)

LK: You said that you don't agree with a few losses, which was the worst and why?

MT: Most of them were very very close. The worst one was when I fought Jason Lea for the Perth Cup in my 13th fight, while Jason had around 36 fights at the time. While I & the crowd felt that I won the fight, one judge had it for me, the other for Jason & the other had it a draw. As there was no provision for an extension round the drawn judge was told to pick a winner & chose Jason so it was awarded to him. Not much of a story there really, though I feel that one of the judges was not completely impartial. Not taking anything away from Jason, he is a top bloke & I respect him a lot he went on to fight on one of the first big Thai Fight tournaments in 2010. I say that I feel that one judge was not impartial, as he also judged the fight I had after that against the New Zealand champion. He had it 50-50 a draw, while the two other judges had me winning every round 50-45, So something not right there.

LK: What titles have you held?

MT: In order: former WPMF super-middleweight & middleweight state titles. WBC Muay thai middleweight national title, ISKA light-middleweight national title, OTBA middleweight national title, WKA south pacific title, WMC middleweight state title - challenging for the WMC national title in October. Again the weight categories are the standard ones for Muay Thai, not the MMA or Glory ones with the same names but different weight categories

LK: Would you say you have a rival at all? If so who and why?

MT: Rivals, none at the moment but I feel that I have unfinished business with those that I had the close losses to.

LK: Okay last one, it's something I ask every fighter,

Hardest puncher you've fought? MT: Pat Doherty

Hardest Kicker you've fought? MT: Ruan DuPlessis

Hardest fight? MT: what aspect of difficulty are you talking here? The hardest fight I had was against Dusan Salva, but it was my hardest as I was stupidly sick for a few days before (and after) the fight, vomiting & bad diarrhea. Was a struggle to eat at all & could not keep much down. I had to try very hard not to shit myself or vomit during the fight. I had to get stitched up after & spewed on the doctor. But hardest fight due to opponent & not circumstances, was probably Ruan DuPlessis.

Favourite Fighter? MT: Roberto Duran

LK: OK thanks a lot Marco, is there anything you feel I've missed and you would like to say, or anything you want to tell your fans and sponsors?

MT: Statement for fans: keep watching as the best is yet to come! I have called out the WMC champion Mike 300 and will be taking him on in October after Steve Moxon. Once I am through with them I will be looking for something even bigger. 

I would also like to thank my sponsor WMD Fight Gear.

There is probably more I would like to cover but its 1:30am and having trouble thinking of topics at the moment. It will likely come to me when I try to fall asleep..... haha

LK: Thanks again Marco and keep training hard, we will be looking forward to hearing about your next wins.

 

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Glory 18: Liverkick Exclusive Post-Fight Interview with Brian Collette

  • Published in Interviews

We managed to get a few words from American Light heavyweight Brian Collette about what he thought went wrong in his fight against Zack Mwekassa. Collette tells us he really didn't feel himself, his trainers also told us at the event that even his warm up seemed flat footed. It seems Collette's mind was not in the right place before or during the fight this time. He actually wasn't doing too badly at the start of the fight, but as soon as he started standing still in front of Mwekassa things took a bad turn, not to mention Zack's jab looked as hard as other peoples right hand which Collette admits was a bit surprising.

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Glory 18: Liverkick Exclusive Post-Fight Interview with Benjamin Adegbuyi

  • Published in Interviews

Benjamin Adegbuyi came away with the decision victory in a hard fought battle with Dutch veteran Hesdy Gerges at Glory 18. This fight was a close one in my eyes and it really was depending on what the judges were looking for. Gerges was walking forward putting pressure on Adegbuyi while throwing lots and lots of low kicks at the same time Benny was throwing big punches and high kicks which was pleasing the crowd and obviously the judges on this one. Adegbuyi was throwing some huge bombs to the body of Hesdy and to be fair I've always wondered why people don't hit Hesdy's body more since his hands are always high, but I got my answer, body punches don't seem to have any effect on Gerges at all.

Anyway, Benny hints to us that there maybe  a possible title fight in the near future for him, and I'm looking forward to that, as I believe Benjamin has what it takes to win the belt.

 

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