LiverKick

Switch to desktop Register Login

LiverKick - LiverKick

Building GLORY's Light Heavyweight Division: Vladimir Mineev

  • Published in Glory

Mineev

Glory 9 brought great action to kickboxing fans this past Saturday. The event also helped the Glory promotion name its first light heavyweight Slam champion, and provided everyone a greater sense of who’s who in a long-underrepresented division. Glory will now have to attract additional talent from around the world to bolster the ranks of an already strong group of light heavyweights. This series of articles looks at kick boxers that we at LiverKick would have liked to see in Saturday’s tournament and hope Glory can bring into the fold going forward.

Vladimir Mineev is a Russian light heavyweight that has been highlighted by our own staff on various occasions as someone to keep an eye on. While the 23-year-old is the youngest fighter to be featured in this series, he already has a number of amateur and professional titles to his name. Mineev is a two-time gold medalist in the -91kg. weight class at the W.A.K.O. European Championships, first winning the competition in 2008.

Mineev hasn’t lost a professional bout since taking Igor Jurkovic to an extension round in December 2010 (part 1, part 2). Mineev put together a 6-0 record while fighting exclusively in Russia in 2011. He duplicated that mark in 2012, traveling outside of Russia once to fight in France.

Mineev started his 2013 with a knockout victory over Revanho Blokland, finishing the bout with a looping left hand near the opening of the second round. He also earned a decision victory over Redouan Cairo in April, taking Cairo’s Wako-Pro title in the process. This most recent bout allowed Mineev to show his offensive arsenal against an extremely capable opponent. Seeing Mineev next to Cairo also reinforced the idea that the Russian needs to remain at light heavyweight for the moment, rather than make the all-too-common jump to heavyweight that similarly situated fighters have made in the past.

Despite Mineev’s success, the young Russian’s recent bouts have not been without some challenge. A left hook sent Mineev to the canvas in the second round of his bout against Ali Cenik last December. Forced to fight from a deficit, Mineev eventually earned the victory with two knockdowns in the extension round.

Vladimir Mineev is scheduled to face off against Brazil’s Tiago Beowulf on August 4th, at the Fight Nights St. Tropez event in scenic Saint Tropez, France.

Read more...

2014: The Emergence of Kickboxing World Titles

  • Published in Kickboxing

GLORY 9

There is going to be some big changes in the Kickboxing world come this year, a change that has been a long-time coming and will see a good deal of pushback from hardcore fans, with that change being that both GLORY and K-1 are going to be pushing individual Championships over tournament champions this year. That isn’t to say that there won’t still be tournaments, as GLORY will be holding Contendership tournaments and K-1 has made mention of still running some tournaments, just not annual World Grand Prix and World MAX tournaments. For a sport that became popular for one-night tournaments this is a huge change.

This isn’t the first time that we’ve seen World Titles in Kickboxing, not by a long shot. In fact, there are a lot of fighters out there in the wild right now who hold one, if not multiple, World Titles through different sanctioning bodies. The ISKA, PKA, WKA, WAKO and many more still sanction World Championships much in the way that we see Boxing with fragmented titles not belonging to any one promoter. The truth of the matter is, though, that those “World Championships” are only as valuable as the promotion, the fighters competing for it and the Champion who holds it.

K-1 attempted to establish Championship titles in the past, with Badr Hari being the first K-1 Heavyweight Champion and Semmy Schilt being the first (and only) K-1 Super Heavyweight Champion. This was K-1’s attempt to move away from the traditional K-1 tournament format in 2007 only to see pushback from both fans and their television partners, keeping the K-1 World Grand Prix as the primary means of crowning a champion.

The announcement by GLORY that this year would see them crown champions across six weight classes is huge, as is K-1’s move under the K-1 Global banner to crown champions outside of the tournament format and to stick to it. While for fans the idea of big tournaments is still the most exciting way to crown champions, it is also a mess for promoters while we watch the established names from the original K-1 starting to retire or show signs of wear and tear. The truth is without huge backing like K-1 had in the 90’s and 00’s from major television networks, building stars in more regions than K-1 ever had to is a huge chore.

Fans will always love their hometown heroes, but with Japan no longer being the home of Kickboxing building stars is now a matter of a global struggle, where you have to do more than appear on Japanese game shows and talk show programs to build up a name. As we saw with GLORY’s Lightweight Tournament, no one is safe, even the unstoppable Giorgio Petrosyan. Establishing Champions makes for something consistent, something that you can sell to the world, a face and a name to go on a masthead. In the case of tournaments you can sell who you think will win, but being able to bill them as your Champion is very different.

Fans understand what a Champion is, will be able to latch onto a Champion and the promotion can market that Champion as the best in the world. I, for one, think that it’ll be a nice change of pace to see Champions established in Kickboxing and for those titles to mean something. The unpredictability of tournaments is exciting and all, but if Kickboxing really wants to grow as a sport it needs to be more inviting, it needs to be more stable, which is exactly what having Champions will do for it.

Read more...

GLORY 15 Ratings Give Mixed Signals

  • Published in Glory

Saki

The ratings for GLORY 15 are in and there sadly isn't a lot to say about them. The truth of the matter is that GLORY was growing in the fall and winter, but a long layoff from being on American television, followed by events airing via tape delay here in the United States, have created a bit of confusion surrounding the brand. To make matters worse, GLORY 15 was pushed up an hour from it's usual 9pm slot to 8pm.

The sad fact is that Tyrone Spong and Gokhan Saki, two of the promotion's bigger stars, were featured heavily on the event. Spike TV remains a lone holdout when it comes to airing sports on tape delay on cable television at this point. I'm not sure what else was airing on Spike TV on Saturday afternoon, but airing GLORY 15 both live and later via tape seems like it'd be the best way to get that bang for your buck out of the GLORY brand. What's troubling is that the numbers that were reported today; 354,000 average, 720,000 peak, are considerably lower than GLORY 14 Zagreb's. The show was also airing the same night as the Pacquiao/Bradley rematch was on PPV, although that played a factor in the time change so to avoid losing viewers.

With GLORY looking to make their PPV debut in June it's not difficult to imagine some of the questions hanging in the air right now.

Read more...

GLORY 15 Istanbul Weigh-in Restuls

  • Published in Glory

GLORY 15

GLORY 15 Istanbul takes place tomorrow, April 12th, from Istanbul, Turkey. The event will feature a one-night, four-man tournament to crown a GLORY Light Heavyweight Champion. Fans across the world are eagerly awaiting the Light Heavyweight tournament, featuring Gokhan Saki, Nathan Corbett, Saulo Cavalari and Tyrone Spong. The card also features a Light Heavyweight bout of note between Danyo Ilunga and Andrei Stoica, as well as Robin van Roosmalen vs. Marat Grigorian.

 

  • GLORY 15 ISTANBUL
  • Robin van Roosmalen (69.5 kg / 153.22 lb) vs. Marat Grigorian (69.8 kg / 155.21 lb)
  • Danyo Ilunga (94.95 kg / 209.33 lb) vs. Andrei Stoica (93.7 kg / 206.57 lb)
  • Tyrone Spong (94.7 kg / 208.78 lb) vs. Saulo Cavalari (94.6 kg / 208.56 lb)
  • Gökhan Saki (94.85 kg / 209.11 lb) vs. Nathan Corbett (94.2 kg / 207.68 lb)
  • GLORY SUPERFIGHT SERIES
  • Jhonata Diniz (111.1 kg / 244.93 lb) vs. Hesdy Gerges (108 kg / 238.10 lb)
  • Randy Blake (95.1 kg / 209.66 lb) vs. Mourad Bouzidi (95.1 kg / 209.66 lb)
  • Filip Verlinden (84.7 kg / 186.73 lb) vs. Israel Adesanya (84.6 kg / 186.51 lb)
  • Atakan Arslan (76.8 kg / 169.32 lb) vs. Jonatan Oliveira (76.65 kg / 168.98 lb)
  • Niclas Larsen (69.5 kg / 153.22 lb) vs. Steve Moxon (69.9 kg / 154.10 lb)
  • Yodkhunpon Sitmonchai* (66.05 kg / 145.62 lb) vs. Raz Sarkisjan (64.25 kg / 141.65 lb)
  • *Yodkhunpon Sitmonchai was re-weighed and came in under the 65 kg limit

 

Read more...

Behind the Scenes of GLORY 15 Istanbul

  • Published in Glory

Gokhan Saki

GLORY packed an arena in Istanbul, Turkey at GLORY 15 Istanbul, with passionate fans who wanted to see their hometown hero take home the gold. They got just that when Gokhan Saki won the GLORY Light Heavyweight Championship. So let's take a look back at what was GLORY 15 with their super-passionate Turkish crowd. It's great to see Saki celebrating backstage after winning the championship, for sure.

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed

Copyright 2010 - 2014 LiverKick.com. All Rights Reserved.

Top Desktop version