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GLORY 16 Denver Weigh-in Video

  • Published in Glory

GLORY

GLORY 16 Denver is close, so close that I can smell it. Wait, I'm not sure that smell is the smell of professional Kickboxing, but none the less, Saturday, May 3rd from the 1stBank Center in Broomfield, Colorado GLORY 16 will air live on Spike TV. The weigh-ins went down Friday in the Denver area and you can catch up on all of the action while you get ready for Saturday night at 9pm Eastern time.

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Card for SuperKombat World Grand Prix Final Elimination on October 25th in Geneva

  • Published in Kickboxing

On October 25th in Geneva, Switzerland SuperKombat will return with the SuperKombat World Grand Prix Final Elimination event. THere are a series of Super Fights lined up for the event that promise to deliver a lot of action, the same with the Final Elimination tournament for the SuperKombat World Grand Prix at Light Heavyweight. The featured bout of the evening is between Super Cruiserweights Andrei Stoica and Moises Baute.

1. Super Fight – Heavyweight Bout (+96 kg)
Enver Sljivar (Bosnia and Herzegovina) vs. Lucian Danilencu (Romania)
2. Super Fight – Light Heavyweight Bout (-81 kg)
Jamie Bates (Great Britain) vs. Yoann Kongolo (Switzerland)
3. Super Fight – Heavyweight Bout (+96 kg)
Nordine Mahieddine (France) vs. Volkan Oezdemir (Switzerland)
4. Quarter Final 1 – Light Heavyweight Bout (-86 kg)
Ibrahim El Bouni (Morocco) vs. Dawid Kasperski (Poland)
5. Quarter Final 2 – Light Heavyweight Bout (-86 kg)
Michael Terrill (Great Britain) vs. Clyde Brunswijk (Suriname)
6. Quarter Final 3 – Light Heavyweight Bout (-86 kg)
Aristote Quitusisa (France) vs. Bogdan Stoica (Romania)
7. Quarter Final 4 – Light Heavyweight Bout (-86 kg)
Beni Osmanoski (Switzerland) vs. Jorge Loren (Spain)
8. Title Fight – Super Cruiserweight Bout (-95 kg)
Moises Baute (Spain) vs. Andrei Stoica (Romania)

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The Humanity Behind the Gods of War

  • Published in Interviews

He sat alone, inconspicuous to the fans around him and to the action inside of the ring, just off to the side of the stage. It was the first seat in the first row right behind the barrier next to the stage. Those were the seats that intentionally weren’t filled and had played host to a revolving-door of fighters and entourages throughout the night. This was the place where the winners and losers found themselves after their night had ended just to watch the show, this was where Ben Edwards found himself moments after Errol Zimmerman had put him down and out in the first round of their fight.

Edwards was sporting a pair of sweatpants and a sweatshirt, looking calm, collected, not tired at all or like he had just been involved in a fight of any kind. He may have been knocked out, but his face lacked the markings of someone who had just taken a series of punches to it. A fan or two in the crowd might have yelled out his name, but he was incognito, almost removed from the event entirely. I watched as he shook his head at the sight of Pat Barry going down for a second time, getting his brains scrambled. Edwards distinctly understood the disappointment that Barry was going through at that moment.

Sometimes it is difficult to humanize the guys that train their hearts out for our entertainment, difficult to understand their sacrifices that they make and how after the bell has rung, they are just as human as you or I are. Today I rolled out of bed facing a ten-year old car that decided not to start, just one month shy now of a wedding that is costing a lot more than we had initially projected. It’s just another cost and another inconvenience among many of late for me. Yesterday was also a day where a job that owes me seven months of pay sent me one month and asked if I’d start working again. I hate saying no, in just about any situation, but I barely have time to collect my thoughts right now, never mind work for a promise while the bills stack up.

It’s safe to say that some days I understand what Ben Edwards was thinking about as he sat there at GLORY 16 in Broomfield, Colorado quite well. I introduced myself to him as he sat there, alone, taking in the atmosphere. He looked relaxed, calm, a bit embarrassed to be found out in his seat. We stood about the same height, similar build, but one of us was just a God of War who was now adjusting to life as a mortal again. That guy was having a rough night. Ben was quick to apologize, to say that he made a mistake, that he got sloppy, but I assured him that it was no big deal and that he’s come so far in the past few years. He knows that I’ve been following his career and knows that I’m quick to talk up his technical evolution over the past few years. We talked about his technical breakdown of Catalin Morosanu from a few months prior before I left him to stew in his thoughts, knowing that having a rough night means that conversation can be laborious -- especially moments after being humanized.

Raymond Daniels, who fought on the undercard, was walking around the floor of the arena where fans were shouting out his name and stopping to take photos with him while Ben Edwards sat watching Errol Zimmerman walking to the ring again. I won’t even pretend to understand his thought process at the moment, although I could make some educated guesses. I myself found the surreal in seeing Edwards sitting there, watching Zimmerman walk to the ring, Daniels being mobbed, while Josh Jauncey and his brother Jay walked by with Andy Souwer in tow and everyone seemed completely unaware of the gravity and sheer madness of the situation.

All I could think is that Edwards was seconds away from being that guy walking to the ring. Edwards was raining down punishment on Zimmerman, but got caught, so here he is, in the stands, watching the world turn without him, a mortal like the rest of us. On that night he was far from home and all of the countries that he’d been to, all of the big shows that he’s fought on, all of the accolades that he had gained throughout his career didn’t matter, he was just another guy who had a rough night on the job. He was just another observer. There was a strong disconnect from victory and defeat.

We talk about these fighters from a distance, we weigh their perceived value and potential matchups. We place them in numbered lists and assign them value based on the last time that we saw them, but sometimes forget to humanize them and relate them to our own day-to-day struggles. Today I woke up thinking about all of the work that I had waiting for me, quickly dismissing messages on my phone asking when I’d have an article up or if I saw their last message. Sometimes I consider changing professions, pulling away from the sliver of the public eye that I have and the abuse that I open myself to daily. I know that I’m not alone in thinking that, either.

The other day Ben Edwards posted on his Facebook that he was available to dog-sit for anyone in his town that needed it. There was a hint of playfulness in it, just like changing his occupation to “Dog Sitter,” but Ben is already back at work training for an upcoming fight. Just like I continue on, Ben Edwards continues on, re-assimilating himself into the image that the world knows him in. The world keeps turning and Ben Edwards is making sure that he’s not just along for the ride, but for one night he was a human being whose hopes and dreams were as fragile and elusive as our own all are. That night I saw Ben Edwards be larger-than-life in the ring, fighting as one of the best Heavyweight in the world against one of the best Heavyweights in the world, then saw him as a vulnerable guy who was much more than the public’s image of him, the promotion’s image of him, my image of him or his own image of himself.

He’s the amalgamation of those images and he’s not them at all, just like we all are.

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Lion Fight 16 to Take Part in UFC International Fight Week

  • Published in Muay Thai

Kevin Ross

UFC's International Fight Week is set for the first week in July, culminating with two, back-to-back events on the weekend. The whole week promises to be full of UFC-related events, but what is interesting is that today Lion Fight announced that Lion Fight 16 would take place on July 4th in Las Vegas as an official part of UFC's International Fight Week. The event will happen at the Pearl at the Palms and have the UFC's official endorsement, meaning that it will be a part of UFC's International Fight Week in a big way.

The event is set to be headlined by Kevin Ross vs. Michael Thompson for Lion Fight's Super Lightweight Championship. Tiffany Van Soest will be the co-main event of the evening with her opponent to be announced in the near future, it will also see Rungravee Sasiprasa make his debut. The event will be broadcast on AXS TV, per usual.

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Glory Last Man Standing: Alex "Po Atan" Pereira Hype Video

  • Published in Glory

Alex Pereira burst on to the kickboxing scene at Glory 14 in Zagreb, Croatia by first knocking out Dustin Jacoby in amazing fashion, then moving on to the finals against Sahak Parparyan and beating him by majority decision. He took the middleweight contender tournament belt back to Brazil and looked very impressive considering this was the first time most of us had seen him.

Now the question is, how will Pereira do with #1 ranked Artem Levin? This will no doubt be the biggest name, probably the best fighter he has ever fought, and tournament favourite. Levin has shown in some of his previous fights that his slippery style with his hands down by his waist can sometimes leave him vulnerable for long straight punches, and this is what Po Atan does best. There is also the factor of Levin looking past Pereira because he has unfinished business with others in the tournament. This would be dangerous for Levin as Pereira has very a long reach, with hard straight punches,if just one lands, it could make for a great night for the Brazilian.

 

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Weekend Results: Enfusion April 5th

  • Published in Europe

Enfusion

In what was a busy weekend for the Kickboxing world, Enfusion LIVE held an event in The Hague, Netherlands this Saturday that saw their unique blend of younger and established fighters putting on quite a show for the crowd.

  • Paolo Renna (R3 - Dec.) Reda Narain
  • Marieke Post (R3 - Dec.) Kristy Ooms
  • Ismael Benali (R3 - Dec.) Kevin Miruka
  • Hicham El Gaoui (R2 - TKO) Andrii Panov
  • Mohamed Boubkari (R4 - KO) Sam Tevette
  • Enfusion -67kg World Title: Mohammed Jaraya (R2 - TKO) Mohamed Galaoui

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Liverkick Throwback: Branko Cikatic Vs Ernesto Hoost II

  • Published in Kickboxing

The world of kickboxing has a rich history to fall back upon so we here at LiverKick figure, why not? Why not give a glimpse into some of the fights from the past that have made up this wonderful sport and tie it all in to the present. The kids on the Instagram and Twitter like to call Thursdays "Throwback Thursdays," I'm just going to say that this is a LiverKick Throwback.

Branco Cikatic was the original Croatian heavyweight Kickboxer and the first Croation born fighter to achieve international success. K-1 didn't start until 1993, Branko was 38 years old already, but he made the most of it and became the very first K-1 grand prix champion and won all three fights in one night by knockout. Cikatic had a rock-solid chin and huge power in both hands, he wasn't the most technical fighter but he was more of a take a punch to land my harder punch type. Branco tried a few MMA fights after winning K-1 and jumped in the Pride ring, now Cikatic was never the cleanest of fighters and that ended up causing most of his Pride fights to end in DQ or No contest.

This fight with the legend Ernesto Hoost was for the K-1 grand prix 1993 Finals in Tokyo, Japan. Hoost was 10 years younger than Cikatic and had already beat Peter Aerts and Maurice Smith in the quarter and semi finals. I feel Hoost was easily winning this fight up until Branko did what he does best and landed a huge right on poor Ernesto's chin and cause a heavy KO.

 

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SuperKombat August 2nd Card

  • Published in Kickboxing

On August 2nd in Constanta, Romania SuperKombat will present their fourth SuperKombat World Grand Prix event of the year. On the top of the card will be Romanian superstar Catalin Morosanu taking on Greek slugger Giannis Stoforidis. Then Nikolaj Falin will take on Romanian Sebastian Ciobanu in the co-main event. This is already shaping up to be one of the better SuperKombat events of the year and should most definitely deliver. 

1. Super Fight – Super Middleweight Bout (-77 kg)
Alex Filip (Romania) vs. TBA (To-be-announced)
2. Super Fight – Middleweight Bout (-71 kg)
Alexandru Popescu (Romania) vs. Claudiu Badoi (Romania)
3. Eliminatory Fight – Middleweight Bout (-71 kg)
Jonay Risco (Spain) vs. Amansio Paraschiv (Romania)
4. Eliminatory Fight – Middleweight Bout (-71 kg)
Cenik Cankurtaranoglu (Turkey) vs. Cristian Milea (Romania)
5. Super Fight – Super Cruiserweight Bout (-95 kg)
Moises Baute (Spain) vs. Vlad Grigore (Romania)
6. Super Fight – Super Cruiserweight Bout (-95 kg)
Nikolaj Falin (Germany) vs. Sebastian Ciobanu (Romania)
7. Super Fight – Heavyweight Bout (+96 kg)
Giannis Stoforidis (Greece) vs. Catalin Morosanu (Romania)

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Photo of the Day: Badr Hari and His Autobiography

  • Published in Kickboxing

Badr Hari

We've been hearing about this Badr Hari book for a while now, now we get to see what it looks like in print. Hell, we get to see Badr Hari holding the Badr Hari book standing in front of the Badr Hari book poster. It's Badr Hari-ception, actually. If you speak Dutch it seems like this is a must-have for Kickboxing fans. If you don't speak Dutch, then, well, it's probably not a must-own unless you are a die hard Badr Hari fan and just want to stare lovingly at it.

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Adidas Announces Partnership with Friday Night Fights

  • Published in Muay Thai

Sports apparel brand adidas has been making a big push into the world of Martial Arts over the past few months with their latest move being an interesting one, to say the least. Today adidas announced that they are teaming up with New York muay thai promotion Friday Night Fights. Adidas seems inspired to look outside of the box in their sponsorships and teaming with Friday Night Fights is a tremendous opportunity for the New York-based promotion that has been making waves for years.

“From our perspective as a brand that so many expect so much from, connecting with the right grass roots fight promotion means everything. Our objective is support the core audience and everyday blue & white collar warriors,”  “The women and men who embrace what it means to face your goals and improve yourself every night you hit the gym are who we care about. This is our company obsession. How do we serve these dedicated people and their beloved sport?  The answer is clear.: We form an alliance with Friday Night Fight’s.”

ACS’s Managing Director Scott Viscomi continues, “when you come to their events, you can feel the energy in the room, it’s electrifying! Justin and his team are long term pro’s who know what it takes to match great athletes, and entertain the people buying seats.  As we work to remind the core market of adidas’ long and rich history in Olympic Judo, Tae Kwon Do, and Boxing to Professional Boxing, MMA, and Kickboxing, we couldn’t have a better strategic partner than FNF to relaunch our Muay Thai programs."

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