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Bas Rutten Confirms Sem Schilt's Retirement

  • Published in Glory

Bas Rutten

Last week we broke the news about Semmy Schilt being retired, which did not seem to rub officials at GLORY the right way, as the news came a day before their big announcement of their partnership with Spike TV. GLORY's CEO even went out to say that as far as he knew Schilt wasn't retired and that we probably didn't have reliable sources on the matter.

There is finally some movement on that front, as Bas Rutten, a longtime friend of Golden Glory and the GLORY organization, confronted the news about Semmy Schilt on AXS TV's Inside MMA this week. According to Rutten it was not a health concern that pushed Semmy into retirement, but him feeling like he had done everything that he wanted to do in both Kickboxing and MMA and that now was the right time for Schilt to step down.

We still stand by the fact that Schilt did discover a condition, but that he is healthy now, but it did play a role in his retirement.


SUPERKOMBAT Teams with Festival dell'Oriente

  • Published in Kickboxing


So SUPERKOMBAT's Eduard Irimia has decided to pay some homage to the world of traditional martial arts with this year's Festival dell'Oriente in Italy. Think of this festival as, well, a huge martial arts festival that will have over 5,000 martial artists from 113 countries competing for a world championship. How SUPERKOMBAT fits in is that on the third day of the festival they will host SUPERKOMBAT New Heroes: Asia vs. the Rest of the World.

The entire Festival dell'Oriente event is based around amateur competition and SUPERKOMBAT is looking to establish itself not only as a professional sports league, but one that is in tune with culture, martial arts and history. SUPERKOMBAT's New Heroes event will also be the only professional sporting event held at the Festival dell'Oriente and will be broadcast to all of SUPERKOMBAT's media partners around the world.

It's an interesting concept and it's cool to see SUPERKOMBAT being involved with something that is connected with the roots of the sport like that.


Live Results for GLORY 23 and GLORY SuperFight Series

  • Published in Americas

Tonight live on Spike TV at 11pm Eastern/8pm Pacific is GLORY 23. GLORY 23 features Nieky Holzken and Raymond Daniels vying for the vacant GLORY Welterweight Championship. The card also features an all-American middleweight tournament with the four men trying to win their way into a future contender's tournament. 

Join us live tonight starting at 9pm Eastern for the GLORY SuperFight Series and then afterwards for GLORY 23 results. Don't forget to follow us on Twitter as well, @LiverKickdotcom, @JayJauncey and @dvewlsh.


GLORY Welterweight Championship: Nieky Holzken def. Raymond Daniels by TKO 3rd Rd (cut due to right knee)

Tournament Final: Dustin Jacoby def. Casey Greene by TKO Rd 2 (ref stoppage)

Xavier Vigney def. Daniel Sam by Split Dec

Tournament: Casey Greene def. Quinton O'Brien by Unanimous Dec

Tournament: Dustin Jacoby def. Ariel Sepulveda by KO Rd 1 (straight right)

GLORY SuperFight Series

Jamal Ben Saddik def. Anderson Silva by TKO Rd 3 (ref stoppage after 2 knockdowns)

Matt Baker def. Edward Hyman by Unanimous Dec

Chad Sugden def. Murthel Groenhart by Split Dec

Anvar Boynazarov def. Giga Chikadze by Split Dec


LiverKick Best of 2013: Fighter of the Year

  • Published in News

Photo (C) Bauzen

The year 2013 was a tremendous year for the sport of Kickboxing as we saw GLORY take aim at America as one of its home bases and really made some strides that I honestly thought we’d never see for the sport here. GLORY not only ran shows, but they ran a bunch of shows and those shows were attended by a good number of paying customers. Then, to top it off, GLORY moved from CBS Sports Network and internet PPVs to Spike TV, picking up steam and viewers with every show. That was a big deal.

GLORY wasn’t the only organization to make moves, either, as we saw another season of the SuperKombat World Grand Prix, the birth of LEGEND in Russia and K-1 starting to get the gears in motion by running both a Heavyweight World Grand Prix and a World MAX tournament within the same year. But which company did what doesn’t really matter, what matters are the fights and the fighters.

Throughout the coming week we’ll be looking at the best of 2013 throughout multiple categories, but first we kick things off with LiverKick’s 2013 Fighter of the Year, which was probably the most competitive category of them all. Just about every GLORY tournament winner deserved a spot as Fighter of the Year and the decision between the last two was incredibly difficult, but a decision was rendered. First, let’s look at the runner-up.

LiverKick 2013 Fighter of the Year - Runner Up: Andy Ristie

Man, what a year for Andy Ristie. The man was a wrecking machine with a five-fight win streak in 2013, including two wins that eclipsed the rest. Ristie’s wins were over Alessandro Campagna, Albert Kraus, Niclas Larsen, Giorgio Petrosyan and Robin van Roosmalen. The last two were by knockout to claim the spot of #1 in the 70kg division across the world, which is a herculean feat.

If it wasn’t for the guy who claimed the top spot having as great of a year as he did, Andy Ristie would have been a shoo-in for Fighter of the Year.

LiverKick 2013 Fighter of the Year: Tyrone Spong

Andy Ristie’s 2013 was incredibly impressive, but Tyrone Spong’s 2013 started off with a complete annihilation of a three-time K-1 World Grand Prix Champion in Remy Bonjasky before heading into the GLORY 9 Light Heavyweight tournament. GLORY 9 was unique in that it was an 8-man tournament, not a 4-man tournament, meaning that Spong had to win three fights in one night, which saw him knock out Michael Duut, pummel Filip Verlinden for three rounds and then stop the reigning king of the Light Heavyweight division, Danyo Ilunga, in just one round.

What followed after that was Tyrone Spong making up for one of the few strange points of contention on his record with a rematch against the legendary Nathan “Carnage” Corbett. Carnage has been the king of 95kg Muay Thai for what seems like forever now, remaining unchallenged. Carnage was on a seven-year win streak (with a random No Contest to Spong in the mix, even though he had knocked Spong out) before he met Tyrone Spong and not only did Spong look good against Carnage, but he looked incredible. No one has been able to make Carnage look that lost in the ring, which is what set Tyrone Spong apart and made him the LiverKick 2013 Fighter of the Year.


Watch Dzhabar Askerov Prepare for Robin van Roosmalen

  • Published in Kickboxing

Dzhabar Askerov, a fighter being sponsored by our good friends at Yokkao, will be fighting this weekend in the Final 16 of the Glory World Series at 70kg. His opponent is one of the best and brightest within the weight class, Robin van Roosmalen. This means that he has a huge challenge ahead of him, but Askerov is no stranger to that kind of challenge. Askerov has a lot of impressive wins over the span of his career, with most of his losses only coming to top competition, such as Buakaw Por. Pramuk, Giorgio Petrosyan, Mike Zambidis and John Wayne Parr. Will Robin be on such a star-studded list of men to defeat Askerov, or will Askerov be able to keep the agressive bulldog that is van Roosmalen at bay and pick him apart?

The only way to find out is to buy the Glory World Series event this weekend. For now, go ahead and watch this video of Askerov training and discussing the fight.


GLORY Releasing GLORY 12 Super Fight Series Fights on Saturday

  • Published in K-1


Trust us, we get it, the whole Super Fight Series thing is mildly confusing at times, as it is basically like old pro wrestling events where you go to a live show but before hand another show is taped, which will air at a later date, while the main show will air live. That is basically what happens at GLORY live events right now and can create some mild confusion when it comes to what actually constitutes a numbered GLORY event or not.

Anyway, we are almost two weeks past GLORY 12 and now this weekend we can expect to see the GLORY Super Fight Series from GLORY 12 on This means that the six undercard fights that you've been waiting for will be available starting this Saturday. Enjoy.


Sports Heroes and Dark, Violent Places: Why we need to worry about a fighter’s mental health.

  • Published in News


DBZ was one of my favorite shows growing up. Every week I would tune in to the epic showdown between good and evil, the final fight between the galaxy’s greatest warriors, the battle to determine the fate of the universe. The story was simple: you had the good guys and the bad guys. Yet, curiously, many of the good guys could also be pretty bad. Goku, the show’s daft yet undyingly good-natured protagonist, was once sent to Earth to destroy all life on the planet. Fortunately for us Earthlings, baby Goku was found by a kind-hearted old man who sensing Goku’s terrifying capacity for destruction, raised Goku to appreciate all forms of life while channeling his latent destructive impulses toward the pursuit of martial arts and friendly martial arts competition. And yet, as ludicrously nice a person as Goku became, he never lost his destructive impulses and bloodlust and instead had to use all of his discipline to suppress his violent urges. Indeed, what’s curious about DBZ and its ostensible heroes is that they were all at one time or another antagonists or outright villains, monsters who murdered millions of lifeforms before evolving motivations aligned them with Goku’s fight to protect the Earth. Yet that never made them champions of right and justice. Piccolo, Vegeta, Android 18, and Majin Buu all possessed an incredible capacity for violence combined with a sadistic or sociopathic desire to cause destruction, but if you ask a DBZ fan, everybody usually has a favorite hero. By the way, if this is spoiling anything for you, then you’re 20 years late to the party.


Glory 17: Glory Prepares to Distinguish Itself As a Combat Sports Brand

  • Published in News

Glory 17 is a turning point for Glory in many ways, marking its entry into the American PPV market by staging the largest, most significant kickboxing tournament on American soil in decades. But even more noteworthy than that, this event signifies the opportunity for Glory to truly distinguish itself as a unique combat sports product that is capable of delivering where other brands may falter, particularly the UFC. The UFC’s present difficulties are well known: problems with a ballooning roster, complaints about “boring” fights, and problems marketing fighters have led to great inconsistency in the quality of UFC events. Glory, on the other hand, has experienced few to no difficulties in this regard--and for very interesting reasons. In this article, I will talk about some of the things that I think make Glory a fairly unique entity in the combat sports world.

1. Each Glory weight class has more elite fighters than a single card can accommodate.

The Last Man Standing tournament is essentially a display of the entire Middleweight division, and it is a scary division, featuring Artem Levin, Joe Schilling, Simon Marcus, Wayne Barrett, Filip Verlinden, and Melvin Manhoef as well as dangerous contenders like Alex Pereira--all of these men are either champions, former champions, or fighters who have distinguished themselves against championship-level competition. Whereas some promotions might struggle to fill fight cards with less accomplished talent, Glory has the unique problem of struggling to fill fight cards with overqualified talent, bumping the likes of Levin to the non-televised SuperFight Series. If you ever find yourself wondering why a fighter like Giorgio Petrosyan gets to occupy the fourth slot on the Glory main card, it’s frequently because any Glory card could offer you a choice of several main event fights.

2. Glory has complete control of the rules of the sport.

No matter how many three or four-letter-name sanctioning bodies Glory will claim accountability to, the fact remains that Glory, as an organization in today’s combat sports market, is unique because of the complete control that it has on the rules of the sport. By frequently changing its clinch rules, its knockdown rules, and its 8-count rules, Glory has crafted and refined a viewing experience that is more fast-paced and exciting, producing a high volume of memorable fights and highlight reel moments. This is an ability that neither the UFC nor any other MMA organization possess, and the end result for them is a perpetual struggle to reconcile the Unified Rules of MMA with the type of fights that UFC wants to sell. Glory, by contrast, can eliminate any rule that negatively affects the viewing experience.

The flipside is that we also don’t have to talk about drug testing in the sport of Kickboxing. Glory is in a peculiar position here as well, operating between the lines of an oversight structure that is very dated and arguably unequipped to handle a multimillion dollar professional sport. Indeed, WKA’s official rules, published in 2011, leave drug testing up to the discretion of the “WKA supervisor, tournament promoters, and the official doctor,” who “can and may perform tests” but don’t necessarily have to do so unless directed by local law, making WKA’s actual responsibility very unclear. The procedure, standards, and logistics of testing are either mentioned in vague terms or not outlined at all. Glory, for its part, hasn’t forced the issue, leaving us to enjoy the fruits of ambiguity. In other words: don’t ask, don’t tell, and Pride never die.

3. Glory is learning how to market its fighters.

This is an issue that we’ve discussed several times here on LiverKick and which Dave Walsh expounded on in his excellent piece comparing kickboxing to the history of regional pro wrestling promotion. Behind every fight is an evolving narrative with at least two central characters, and as viewers, we’re interested in not only the fight itself but also in how the fight will determine the next chapter of the story. The promoter’s job is to build anticipation and interest in the fight and to illustrate what it means in the grand scheme of the division. With Glory 17, Glory has been proactive in producing media which tells us the story, including an excellent video on the rivalry between Rico Verhoeven and Daniel Ghita. The authenticity of this rivalry (for the critics’ sake) is as irrelevant as the authenticity of the 2009 rivalry between Badr Hari and Alistair Overeem--it felt real at the time and it electrified the atmosphere at the Saitama Super Arena. As Glory gains screen time on television and PPV, promotional efforts like this will be increasingly vital to its success.

While Glory got off to a rough start, it seems like the organization has found its identity as a kickboxing promotion and major combat sports brand. It is undeniably a unique presence in today’s sports entertainment market. If this event is a success and the Glory audience continues to grow, I think that Glory could become a leading company. Until then, you will have to join me in keeping fingers tightly crossed.


Former FEG Head Sadaharu Tanikawa Producing GLORY 13 Tokyo

  • Published in Glory


In what is an absolutely stunning turn of events, former FEG President Sadaharu Tanikawa, best known as K-1's Executive Producer, has been announced as the Producer behind GLORY 13. The shocking announcement went down today in Japan, which came packaged with the fact that this should also be the retirement fight of Peter Aerts, which seems to be the public impetus behind Tanikawa's involvement. There is very clear language involved to this being a "one time deal" between Tanikawa and GLORY, but facts are still facts and Tanikawa owes a lot of the fighters rumored to be participating on the event money.

What makes this an even stranger partnership is the very public assaults from Bas Boon towards Tanikawa in the past few years. Boon has made it clear that Tanikawa's FEG owes Golden Glory millions of dollars and it was Bas Boon's lawsuit against Tanikawa and FEG that forced them to formally declare bankruptcy in 2012. It is our understanding that none of the money owed was ever paid out by FEG due to the bankruptcy proceedings and the shame is that K-1 Global has taken the reputation of FEG and Tanikawa with them while having nothing to do with them. The irony also comes from claims from Golden Glory that K-1 Global's Mr. Kim was associated with Tanikawa and FEG, with this move making it very clear that there was never a partnership.

Even with all of this, I'm not willing to condemn anyone here. Tanikawa, from what is public, was in an awful position of organizing a corrupt organization. Japanese bankruptcy law is also odd, too odd for me to even pretend to be an expert on or to be able to properly navigate. The money owed is still through FEG. It's just odd to see these two sides working together.

For what it's worth, there is talk of a "major television deal" possibly happening and Fuji TV officials being in attendance was mentioned in the same article, aligning with rumors we've heard.

Happy Halloween?

UPDATE: Upon speaking to a GLORY official about this, we've learned that the role of "Producer" has been exaggerated. He will be serving as a consultant for the Super Fight Series undercard only.


The King of the Ring Part II Video

  • Published in Glory

Part II of "The King of the Ring" featuring Tyrone Spong, from the team that brought you The Reem. This episode follows Tyrone Spong around while he prepares for his bout with Remy Bonjasky as well as focuses on his life in Miami.

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